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‘You almost had me murdered’: AOC doesn’t want Cruz to join bipartisan push to investigate Robinhood

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Amid controversy surrounding the financial app Robinhood, progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and conservative Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) have agreed that Congress needs to look into the app’s decision to prevent retail investors from freely buying stocks while hedge funds still can.

“This is unacceptable. We now need to know more about @RobinhoodApp’s decision to block retail investors from purchasing stock while hedge funds are freely able to trade the stock as they see fit,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted shortly before noon Thursday. “As a member of the Financial Services Cmte, I’d support a hearing if necessary.”

The self-described democratic socialist was retweeting a report and thread from the outlet Motherboard that Robinhood has stopped users from purchasing stock in GameStop, AMC, Blackberry, and Nokia, saying that “more than half of all Robinhood users own at least some GameStop stock.” These users are now “unable to freely trade it” and “the app is only allowing users to close out their positions.”

MORE ON GAMESTOP & THE STOCK MARKET: WH press secretary replies to question about stock market concerns: ‘We have the first female treasury secretary’

Cruz retweeted Bronx and Queens congresswoman, simply saying: “Fully agree.”

While saying to Cruz she is “happy to work with Republicans on this issue where there’s common ground,” Ocasio-Cortez also told the Texas Republican: “but you almost had me murdered 3 weeks ago so you can sit this one out.”

“Happy to work w/ almost any other GOP that aren’t trying to get me killed,” she added. “In the meantime if you want to help, you can resign.”

Ocasio-Cortez is referring to Cruz being one of the Republicans who was spearheading the effort to challenge the states’ Electoral College votes on January 6, when Congress tallied them and certified President Joe Biden’s 2020 election victory, believing allegations of election fraud. That day, a mob of Trump supporters violently stormed the U.S. Capitol to prevent certification and to “stop the steal.” Other Democrats in Congress have called for the resignation of Cruz as well as Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), who also helped lead the effort.

Midday on Thursday, while Ocasio-Cortez and Cruz were exchanging tweets, a class action complaint was filed against Robinhood in the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York.

Also on the same day of this back-and-forth between the two, former President Donald Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., and fellow “Squad” member Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) are also agreeing with the two about Robinhood.

“It took less than a day for big tech, big government and the corporate media to spring into action and begin colluding to protect their hedge fund buddies on Wall Street,” Trump Jr. tweeted Thursday morning. “This is what a rigged system looks like, folks!”

Trump Jr. was retweeting an article from the founder of pop-culture site Barstool Sports, Dave Portnoy, criticizing Robinhood.

Tlaib retweeted the same Motherboard thread as Ocasio-Cortez—though prior to the New York congresswoman—saying: “This is beyond absurd. @FSCDems need to have a hearing on Robinhood’s market manipulation. They’re blocking the ability to trade to protect Wall St. hedge funds, stealing millions of dollars from their users to protect people who’ve used the stock market as a casino for decades.”

Replying to the popular finance-centric social media account “litquidity” pointing out that this odd assortment of political figures agrees with each other, Trump Jr. said: “Seriously…. I’m going long on Flying Pigs…”

https://twitter.com/DonaldJTrumpJr/status/1354844889985523719

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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CO leaders stating they won’t use any city money to support migrants or to alleviate the crisis in Denver

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In February 2018, Denver city leaders sent a valentine to foreigners interested in relocating to the progressive mountain city and a message to any elected officials looking to stop them:

Draped on Denver’s City and County building was a large, blue banner: “Denver ❤️ Immigrants.”

Then-mayor Michael Hancock event posted on social media that it was a statement of “love” to let immigrants know that Denver is “an open and welcoming city.” However, six years later, Denver residents are facing an uphill battle of repercussions from the liberal leaders’ actions. Amid a crisis that has seen more than 40,000 migrants arrive in the city since late 2022, Denver leaders have a new message: If you stay in Denver, you will suffer.

“The opportunities are over,” an official with new mayor Mike Johnston’s office told a gathering of migrants in Spanish inside a city shelter in late March, according to a video obtained by a local television station. “New York gives you more. Chicago gives you more.”

On Monday, Douglas County filed a lawsuit against the state of Colorado and its Democratic governor Jared Polis in Denver District Court over the issue.

The lawsuit is challenging the constitutionality of two state laws passed by Democrats in the Colorado legislature: a 2019 law that restricted the ability of local law enforcement to cooperate with federal immigration officials in civil cases, and a 2023 law that prohibits local governments from entering or renewing detention agreements with ICE and that prohibits them from funding immigration detention facilities owned or operated privately.

“The nation is facing an immigration crisis. The nation, the state, and local governments need to cooperate and share resources to address this crisis,” the lawsuit states, adding that the 2019 and 2023 laws in question “prohibit the necessary cooperation and create dangerous conditions for the State and migrants.”

Teal contends that “the state doesn’t have the inherent authority to limit the ability of a local jurisdiction to work with any agency, regardless be it local, state, or federal.” By doing so, he said, “the state is inhibiting the local communities, the local jurisdictions from providing for the safety” of their residents.

“We are seeing what is going on in Denver, and we do not want that coming here to Douglas County. It is not safe,” Douglas County commissioner Lora Thomas, a former state trooper, said during a Monday morning press conference announcing the lawsuit.

Douglas commissioner Abe Laydon said on Monday that the lawsuit “is about putting America first and about putting Coloradans first.” As a Latino, he said, he recognizes “the plight of those seeking refuge and asylum here in the United States,” but he added that “Douglas County is a place where quality of life comes first.”

National Review reports on the mile-high city’s crisis:

In January, the city was housing and feeding almost 5,000 migrants, mostly Venezuelans, in hotel shelters. Other migrants slept in tents on sidewalks and in parking lots, adding a new wrinkle to Denver’s ongoing struggles with panhandling and squalid homeless camps.

At intersections throughout Denver, migrants with water bottles and squeegees head into traffic to try to make a few bucks washing drivers’ windshields.

To address a migrant-driven financial crunch, the city is now cutting hours at local rec centers, slashing park programming, and freezing hiring in some departments. To save a little money, the city has decided against planting flowers in some of its parks and medians this spring.

The migrant crisis has cost the Denver region at least $170 million, according to a conservative estimate by Colorado’s Common Sense Institute, which looked at city spending as well as school and hospital costs, and is almost surely an undercount.

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