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Yes, It’s That Bad: San Fran Residents Leaving Trunks Open to Deter Thieves from Breaking In

Some residents have begun leaving their parked vehicles with the trunks left open in the hope of discouraging auto break-ins.

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San Francisco’s liberal policies have resulted in soaring crime rates and criminals armed with the knowledge that in all likelihood they will never be arrested, let alone prosecuted. Citizens have had to come up with ways to defend their property.

“Imagine having to clean out your car and leaving it open in public, just so people won’t break your windows. Oakland we looking sad man” said one witness. “We’ve heard of cars being left unlocked, windows rolled down, but now some people are leaving their trunks open too. It’s raising eyebrows as reports of car break-ins are on the rise in San Francisco and Oakland” reports abc 7.

Oakland’s Interim Deputy Police Chief Drennon Lindsey said the desperation “doesn’t really surprise me. ”Lindsey continued, “even if you think I’m just going to put my laptop in my trunk…if it’s on, they have technology to detect it in the car…even if it’s hidden.”

Former San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) Chief Garret Tom who spent 40 years on the force lamented “we’re in different times…that’s unbelievable.” SFPD has reported a whopping 32 percent increase in car break-ins this year compared to last year.

The city has seen a 25 percent spike in auto burglaries, with the same happening in Oakland. Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said “we have got to do more to get us through this holiday season.”

Schaaf suggested people buy security cameras to protect their belongings, and help with surveillance. “Pointing the cameras towards the street and register it with the Oakland Police Department” said Schaaf.

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Nation

Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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supply chain

The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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