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Wuhan lab’s U.S. partner questioned about COVID viral load manipulation

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Wuhan Institute of Virology – along with its U.S. partner – manipulated the COVID virus in violation of regulations established by the National Institutes of Health. The manipulation of the virus allowed the it to to generate up to 10,000 times the viral load, according to information provided in a letter from the NIH to House Republicans.

This new information puts to rest claims that the virus was not manipulated to be more lethal and is a vindication to those that questioned Dr. Anthony Fauci’s earlier allegations that the NIH did not fund research.

In the NIH letter the agency stated that EcoHealth ( the US partner) violated provisions in its contract “requiring to report to government funders should one of the viruses in its experiment product ‘a one log increase in growth.’ The company did not report the increase. Instead, it worked with the Wuhan lab, and created extraordinary growth in the virus load from 1,000 fold to 10,000 fold. This increase led to severe disease in mice and deaths in the laboratory, according to reports.

News outlets that shunned those who questioned whether the virus was manipulated should be called out for their failure to do their job. Remember, questioning something does not make you a conspiracy theorist. In fact, asking questions and holding the government, agencies and departments accountable is wise and necessary for truth in any Democracy.

From Roll Call:

“NIH said the nonprofit partner, EcoHealth Alliance, must submit any unpublished data to the agency by Monday to come back into compliance with its NIH grant. Any new documents could shed further light on the controversial nonprofit’s research.

The EcoHealth project ran afoul of NIH terms because it experimented with changing the spike protein of a bat coronavirus identified by researchers as “poised for human emergence” and tested how well it infected human airway cells, according to the letter released by House Oversight and Reform ranking member James R. Comer, R-Ky., late Wednesday. The committee also released a long overdue progress report detailing the group’s work from 2018 to 2019. EcoHealth, a New York-based intermediary between the NIH and the Wuhan Institute of Virology, did not submit it to NIH until August.”

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COVID-19

Watchdog: Pentagon likely rushed denials of COVID-19 vaccine Religious Exemption requests

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The Army only approved just 24 religious COVID-19 vaccine exemption requests out of a total 8,514 requests submitted by active duty soldiers, and  1,602 requests have been rejected while the rest remain pending.

Military.com obtained information showing the Pentagon rushed vaccine exemption denials:

Sean O’Donnell, the Pentagon’s inspector general, wrote in a June 2 memo to Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin obtained by Military.com calling attention to a “concerning” trend in which military brass rushed to reject vaccine-exemption petitions rather than giving each request due consideration.

“We found a trend of generalized assessments rather than the individualized assessment that is required by Federal law and DoD and Military Service policies,” he said. “Some of the appellate decisions included documentation that demonstrated a greater consideration of facts and circumstances involved in a request.”

In March, a Texas judge blocked the Navy from dismissing sailors with pending exemption requests and in August, a Florida federal judge ordered class action relief and granted an injunction barring the federal government from enforcing the vaccine mandate for the Marine Corps.

National Review writes, “For the last year, military has been struggling with a recruitment problem. As of July, with only three months left in the fiscal year, the Army had met only 40 percent of its recruitment goal and reduced its active-duty force by 12,000 troops.”

O’Donnell calculated that officials likely gave each appeal a cursory glance rather than a thorough examination, possibly opening the door to litigation from service members who had to resign after they failed to obtain exemptions. Across all the branches, there were about 50 denials per day in a 90-day period, he determined. Over a thousand Coast Guardsmen have already tried to launch a class-action lawsuit in response to their being refused religious exemptions, the publication noted.

“The volume and rate at which decisions were made to deny requests is concerning,” the memo read. “Assuming a 10-hour work day with no breaks or attention to other matters, the average review period was about 12 minutes for each package. Such a review period seems insufficient to process each request in an individualized manner and still perform the duties required of their position.”

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