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Will Pres. Trump lose his Twitter account when he leaves office?

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Twitter has been a longtime podium for President Donald Trump, going back to his account’s creation in 2009, a period when the social media site was just three years young but astronomically gaining more and more mainstream traction. However, when President-elect Joe Biden is sworn in as president on January 20, Trump’s account will lose certain protections Twitter has granted him for the past four years as a world leader.

The social media giant has policies that it applies to currently serving world leaders and some other officials, which gives them leeway with tweets of theirs that would otherwise violate the website’s content policy if they were regular Twitter users. Instead of removing the policy-violating tweets and content, the company leaves it on its site if there’s “a clear public interest value to keeping the tweet on the service.”

News officially broke that Twitter, while not saying Trump’s name or job title explicitly, would rescind its special treatment of world leaders once they no longer hold their positions and become private citizens, a Twitter spokesperson told The Verge in a November 7 report.

“Twitter’s approach to world leaders, candidates, and public officials is based on the principle that people should be able to choose to see what their leaders are saying with clear context. This means that we may apply warnings and labels, and limit engagement to certain tweets. This policy framework applies to current world leaders and candidates for office, and not private citizens when they no longer hold these positions,” the spokesperson confirmed to the online technology publication.

At a November 17 congressional hearing, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey confirmed that the account of a given world leader, once they are no longer in power, would not be subject to this policy, saying, “If an account suddenly is not a world leader anymore, that particular policy goes away”.

Trump undeniably changed the entire political game with his use of Twitter in 2015 and 2016, with commentators and outlets, such as Vox, remarking at the time that he had “weaponized Twitter — with dangerous consequences“.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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