Connect with us

Elections

Who is Supreme Court Justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett?

Published

on

amyconeyBarrett MG 1198

President Donald Trump nominated Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court Saturday to fill the seat vacated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The president made the announcement during the much anticipated White House event Saturday. He also joked before Barrett came up to speak that she would have a smooth confirmation, knowing that the Democrats are ready to put up fight.

“Today it is my honor to nominate one of our nation’s most brilliant and gifted legal minds to the Supreme Court,” said Trump. “She is a woman of unparalleled achievement, towering intellect, sterling credentials and unyielding loyalty to the Constitution.”

Her story is remarkable and those who know her, including some who worked for Justice Ginsburg, support her nomination. She is a devoted wife and the working mother of seven children. Two of her children were adopted from Haiti and one child has special needs. In her address at the White House post her nomination, she spoke highly of her husband and the importance of family.
 

She would be only the fifth woman to serve on the Supreme Court. With her confirmation she would become the only mother currently on the Court.

Yet, it is her future that will determine the course of the nation. Her love for the Constitution and justice makes her the best warrior to protecting America and the rights our nation grants its citizens.

Here’s some fast facts about Barrett and why this decision by President Trump will mark his legacy and in my opinion make his presidency one of the greatest in modern political history.

Her Career and Education

  • First, Barrett serves as a judge on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, after she was confirmed to that court with Bipartisan support in 2017.
  • She graduated magna cum laude from Rhodes College and summa cum laude and first in her class from Notre Dame Law School
  •  Barrett clerked for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and renowned Circuit Court Judge Laurence Silberman.
  •  Scalia considered her his best student
  • The American Bar Association rated her “well qualified” during her 2017 Circuit Court confirmation
  •  Barrett is a Professor at Notre Dame Law School since 2002.
  • Formerly, she taught law at the University of Virginia and George Washington University 

More than 70 prominent legal scholars signed a letter in support of Barrett’s 2017 nomination
 

Important Facts:

  • All living  Supreme Court clerks who worked with Barrett in 1998 wrote in support her nomination. Three of those clerks worked for Justice Ginsburg.
  •  Every single full-time faculty member at Notre Dame Law School – 49 total – signed a letter in support of Barrett’s nomination
  •   470 of Barrett’s former students signed a letter in support of her nomination in 2017 
  • Barrett is a devout Catholic, and is actively involved in her community and her church
  • Barrett Attended Notre Dame Law School On A Full-Tuition Fellowship And Won The Hoynes Prize, Given To The Graduate With The Best Academic Record.
  • Barrett Served As Executive Editor Of The Notre Dame Law Review. (“Hon. Amy Coney Barrett,” University Of Notre Dame, Accessed 9/19/20)
  • All living  Supreme Court clerks who worked with Barrett in 1998 wrote in support her nomination. Three of those clerks worked for Justice Ginsburg.
  •  Every single full-time faculty member at Notre Dame Law School – 49 total – signed a letter in support of Barrett’s nomination
  •   470 of Barrett’s former students signed a letter in support of her nomination in 2017 
  • Barrett is a devout Catholic, and is actively involved in her community and her church
  • Barrett Attended Notre Dame Law School On A Full-Tuition Fellowship And Won The Hoynes Prize, Given To The Graduate With The Best Academic Record.
  • Barrett Served As Executive Editor Of The Notre Dame Law Review. (“Hon. Amy Coney Barrett,” University Of Notre Dame, Accessed 9/19/20)

You may like

Continue Reading

Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

Published

on

Election

New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Join Sara's mailing list to receive the latest stories as soon as they're available!

You have Successfully Subscribed!