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WH Press Sec. Slams Dem Governors, Mayors After Spike In Violence Over The Weekend

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Screenshot 2020 06 22 13.56.42

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany slammed Democratic leaders in Minneapolis, Chicago, New York, and Seattle over the weekend’s record violence, during Monday’s press briefing. Watch below:

“This past Father’s Day weekend, we saw violence across the country, but we saw scant media coverage of this violence,” McEnany said. “Let’s be clear here: These states are responsible for policing their streets, the governors, the mayors are responsible for ensuring that our streets are safe, that the American people are protected. And what we have seen is in far too many Democrat-run states and Democrat-run cities, we have seen violence and chaos and nothing like the law and order that we saw here in D.C. when President Trump stepped in and surged the National Guard.”

In Chicago, the weekend saw its highest number of shootings this year, with 102 people shot, 14 of them fatally, as reported. In Minneapolis, there were 11 people shot and 1 killed. In New York City, Saturday saw one shooting per hour with 24 people shot in the single day, according to The New York Post. In Seattle, the autonomous zone created by anarchist groups in the area, known as ‘CHAZ’ or ‘CHOP,’ two people were shot, one fatally.

“It is the responsibility of governors to protect their states, to police their streets. The police power rests at the state level. And we expect mayors to step up and to do their job. And for governors to step up and do their job in the mold of President Trump, who secured D.C. after a night of lawlessness two weeks ago,” McEnany said.

Concluding her remarks on the spike in violence, McEnany called ‘the defund the police movement’ “misguided,” adding that “it will only hurt the vulnerable citizens of American cities the most. It’s sad and it is shameful.”

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Nation

Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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