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Wayne County Republican Canvassers Rescind Their Votes After Claims of Bullying

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The two Republicans on the Wayne County Board of Canvassers, Monica Palmer and William Hartmann, have both rescinded the votes they cast to certify the election results on Wednesday, claiming that they were bullied into siding with Democrats.

According to the affidavit, Palmer and Hartmann had refused to vote to certify the election in Michigan’s most populous county because they felt there was so many voting irregularities, Fox & Friends reported Wednesday.

Both Republicans say they were called racists and subjected to threats for raising concerns about ballots that Democrats said were from predominately Black communities, Jenna Ellis, a lawyer for the Trump 2020 Campaign, told Fox News on Tuesday.

Palmer said in her affidavit that she faced “accusations of racism” and threats to her family.

“After the vote, my Democratic colleagues chided me and Mr. Hartmann for voting not to certify,” she said, according to the affidavit. “After the vote, the public comment period began and dozens of people made personal remarks against me and Mr. Hartmann. The comments made accusations of racism and threatened me and members of my family. The public comment continued for over two hours and  I felt pressured to continue the meeting without a break.”  

“I sat for two hours listening to people attack me,” she added. “The Democrats were too busy trying to belittle me.”

After a “pressure campaign” they then said they would vote to certify the election under the agreement that the Secretary of State, Jocelyn Benson, would run an audit on the votes.

“Later that evening I was sent statements that Secretary Jocelyn Benson made, saying that she did not view our audit resolution to be binding. Her comments disputed the representations made by the vice chair on which I relied. As a result of these facts I rescind my prior vote to certify Wayne County elections. I fully believe Wayne County votes should not be certified,” Palmer said in her affadavit.

Hartmann mirrored her statement.

“I voted not to certify, and I still believe this vote should not be certified. Until these questions are addressed, I remain opposed to certification of the Wayne County results,” Hartmann said in his affidavit.

President Donald Trump tweeted in support of the Republican canvassers.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1329086548093014022

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Meta to reinstate Trump’s Facebook, Instagram ‘in coming weeks’

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Meta’s president of Global Affairs Nick Clegg announced former President Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts will be reinstated “in coming weeks” after a more than two-year suspension.

“Our determination is that the risk [to public safety] has sufficiently receded,” Meta Clegg said in a blog post. “As such, we will be reinstating Mr. Trump’s Facebook and Instagram accounts in the coming weeks. However, we are doing so with new guardrails in place to deter repeat offenses.”

Twitter restored Trump’s account in November following its takeover by billionaire Elon Musk, but the former president has not yet resumed tweeting. Therefore it is unclear if he will use any of his former social media platforms, or instead remain on his own social media platform, Truth Social.

Clegg said “We just do not want — if he is to return to our services — for him to do what he did on January 6, which is to use our services to delegitimize the 2024 election, much as he sought to discredit the 2020 election.”

New “guardrails” include new policies around restricting accounts by public figures during civil unrest. Under those policies, Meta can decide to restrict the account of a public figure that violates its community standards for a time ranging from one month to two years.

“If he now posts further violating content, that content will be removed, of course, and he could be suspended for between one month and two years, depending on the severity of the violation,” Clegg said.

Posts will also be able to be limited on distribution without removing them or temporarily restricting access to its advertising tools. “Oblique references to QAnon content, for instance … is the kind of material that — even if it’s done obliquely, and doesn’t violate our community standards — we would seek to restrict the distribution of the content and/or restrict his ability to advertise,” added Clegg.

 

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