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Wall Street Journal calls out Twitter’s B.S., says policy to censor dangerous to a free society

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The decision by Twitter’s CEO Jack Dorsey to censor The New York Post’s stories on Hunter Biden’s alleged emails that expose a possible meeting between his father, then -Vice President Joe Biden, and Ukrainian officials connected with the Ukrainian energy giant Burisma Holdings, was extraordinary.

Dorsey’s social media platform, which is a primary tool to share information on the Internet, made the decision to censor the story revealing its support for Biden in the 2020 election.

The Wall Street Journal Editorial page pointed out the inconsistencies with Dorsey’s explanation as to why his platform not only blocked the story but stopped users from sharing the story.

I made the decision on Thursday last week to stop using Twitter for a week. It wasn’t that difficult but many people I know called to say they wish they could do it but just couldn’t seem to manage. They were afraid of doing so because of the election, because they wouldn’t get their stories out, because frankly, we’ve all become to reliant on these platforms. I’ll discuss that in a future column.

But I loved the way the Wall Street Journal editorial called out Twitter. Read some of what the paper had to say below. It’s right on target.

“Twitter says it acted because the Post story violated its “hacked materials” policy. It’s true that the provenance of the story is open for debate and scrutiny—the Post says a laptop with the emails was delivered to a Delaware repair shop, and that the owner gave them to Donald Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Notably, the Biden campaign has not explicitly denied the authenticity of the emails….The problem is that if Twitter has a policy against “content obtained without authorization,” as the company added, it has a policy against journalism—especially journalism in the Trump era. In 2017 and 2018 the Justice Department fielded 208 criminal referrals for leaks of classified information, more than three times as many as in the prior two years. Stories based on Administration leaks, including about national security matters, have circulated widely on Twitter.

Such stories ought to be read with a skeptical eye. But Twitter would never think of canceling the account of a news outlet reporting on the 2017 leaked emails from the Environmental Protection Agency, for example. The site allowed feverish falsehoods about Brett Kavanaugh to circulate as Democrats sought to sink his Supreme Court nomination.”

You can follow Sara A Carter on Twitter @SaraCarterDC

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Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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