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VP on Trump’s Police Reform E.O.: ‘We’re not gonna defund the police, quite the contrary’

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Trump Signs Social Media EO

President Donald Trump is expected to sign an executive order on policing Tuesday that will implement new resources and norms for law enforcement. Some of that change includes bringing social workers into communities, reforming use of force standards, and keeping records on officer behavior.

“Today, even as Congress considers legislation…, The President is gonna take this action to assure the American people that we’re listening, we’re supporting law enforcement, we’re not gonna defund the police, quite the contrary, we’re gonna find new resources to help departments obtain certifications that improve standards for the use of force, improve training, de-escalation. That’s exactly what the American people want us to do,” Vice President Mike Pence told “Fox & Friends” hosts Tuesday morning.

The White House says that the order will support both better public safety and public trust. Moreover, it will support police, equipping them with the resources necessary to keep the country safe.

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Nation

Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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