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Twitter sued for libel by repairman of Hunter Biden’s alleged laptop

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The former Delaware computer repair shop owner who says he obtained Hunter Biden’s laptop sued Twitter for a second time over how the social media platform handled a New York Post exposé on President Joe Biden‘s son, Hunter Biden, alleging the tech company defamed him by implying he was a hacker, The Washington Examiner reported Friday.

On Thursday, John Paul Mac Isaac filed his lawsuit in the Southern District of Florida. He claims in the suit that he was forced to shut down his business, in part, because Twitter labeled the contents of Hunter Biden’s laptop as being hacked materials, which he denied, and he said had damaged his reputation, as reported.

“Plaintiff is not a hacker and the information obtained from the computer does not constitute hacked materials because Plaintiff lawfully gained access to the computer, first with the permission of its owner, Biden,” Mac Issac’s attorney.

A Twitter spokesperson declined to comment to SaraACarter.com on the latest Mac Isaac lawsuit.

The previous lawsuit, also alleging defamation and demanding $500 million in damages, was filed in the same court and tossed out by a judge in late December due to lack of jurisdiction. In his new case, according to The Examiner, Mac Isaac attempts to bypass the jurisdiction issue, with him also saying that there had been defamation damages greater than $75,000 and that the exact award amount could be determined after a trial.

Additionally, Mac Isaac asked Twitter to “make a public retraction of all false statements and to issue a public apology” to him, according to the publication.

“Plaintiff is not a hacker and the information obtained from the computer does not constitute hacked materials because Plaintiff lawfully gained access to the computer, first with the permission of its owner, Biden, and then, after Biden failed to retrieve the recovered data despite Plaintiff’s reuses, in accordance with the Mac Shop’s abandoned property policy,” Mac Isaac’s lawyer argued in the first lawsuit. “Plaintiff, as a direct result of Defendant Twitter’s actions and statements, is now widely considered a hacker.”

In the October New York Post exposé, the publication reported that it had obtained a copy of a laptop and hard drive belonging to Hunter Biden from Rudy Giuliani, a lawyer for then-President Donald Trump. Giuliani, according to The Examiner, alleged that he received the hard drive from Mac Isaac’s repair shop, with Mac Isaac having also said that he also provided a copy to the FBI after Hunter Biden had dropped it off for repairs in April 2019.

Hunter Biden, it should be noted, has not denied ownership over the hard drive.

Specifically, the exposé reported that emails presented proof of a possible meeting between then-Vice President Biden, Hunter Biden, and high-ranking executive at a Ukrainian energy firm called Burisma, which President Biden denies occurring as illustrated in the exposé. On top of that, The Post also reported on the younger Biden’s financial dealings with suspicious foreign nationals, especially Chinese ones.

Biden’s campaign and many in the media dismissed the Hunter Biden laptop story as being part of a Russian disinformation operation, as The Examiner pointed out, though then-Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe said that “there is no intelligence that supports that … Hunter Biden’s laptop is part of some Russian disinformation campaign.”

When The Post tried to share its reports to Twitter, the social media giant alleged that the publication violated its “hacked” materials policy by posting them.

“Twitter knew or should have known that its statement that the New York Post’s story contained hacked materials would cause harm to the Plaintiff,” Mac Isaac’s lawyer argued, according to The Examiner. “The statements allege that Plaintiff committed crimes including (but not limited to) computer hacking of the son of the Democratic Party nominee, now President, Joe Biden. The implication of an attempt to undermine American democracy and the 2020 presidential election is obvious.”

In late December, Judge Beth Bloom, a federal court judge in Florida, swiftly threw out Mac Isaac’s first lawsuit, saying: “The Court lacks subject matter jurisdiction […] The Complaint alleges that Plaintiff is a resident of Delaware and that Defendant is a Delaware corporation with an office in Dade County, Florida. […] The Complaint fails to allege complete diversity.”

In his latest lawsuit, according to The Examiner, Mac Isaac said he now lives in Colorado as he filed the lawsuit in Florida, arguing Twitter operates in Florida, has Florida offices, and caused injury to Mac Isaac while doing business in the Sunshine State.

Moreover, his lawsuit was also filed against MadBits LLC, alleging that it “exists solely to allow Defendant Twitter to operate its business and employ employees in the State of Florida,” per The Examiner. The case argued that “Twitter’s actions and statements had the specific intent to communicate to its users, including its Florida resident users, that Plaintiff is a hacker and/or hacked the published materials.”

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Trump: Tanks to Ukraine could escalate to use of ‘NUKES’

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Former President Donald Trump stated bluntly on Truth Social,  “FIRST COME THE TANKS, THEN COME THE NUKES. Get this crazy war ended, NOW. So easy to do!”

Trump was referring to the escalation of war in Ukraine. He, like many other commentators and lawmakers, are warning that the decision to continue sending weapons – and now tanks – could potentially lead to the use of “nuclear weapons.”

It’s mission creep and it’s dangerous, they say.

Why? Because Russian President Valdimir Putin has indicated in two different speeches that he would use nuclear weapons to defend Russia, if needed. Those warnings are not just bluster but a very real possibility.

And the escalation of war is visible.

Russia launched 55 missiles strikes across Ukraine Thursday, leaving 11 dead. The strikes come one day after the United States and Germany agreed to send tanks to Ukraine in an effort to aide the country. 47 of the 55 missiles were shot down according to Ukraine’s Air Force command.

Eleven lives were lost and another 11 were injured additionally leaving 35 buildings damaged in the wake of the attacks. According to The New York Times, Denys Shmyhal, said in a post on Telegram. “The main goal is energy facilities, providing Ukrainians with light and heat,” he said.

Ukraine is now demanding that they need F-16 fighter jets. In a post on twitter Ukrainian lawmaker, Oleksiy Goncharenko said, “Missiles again over Ukraine. We need F16.”

The US has abstained from sending advanced jets in the chances that a volatile decision could foster more dangerous attacks like former President Trump’s post on Truth referred to. If the US did authorize the decision to lend Ukraine the F-16 jets Netherlands’ foreign minister, Wopke Hoekstra, would be willing to supply them. According to The New York Times, Hoekstra told Dutch lawmakers, “We are open-minded… There are no taboos.”

F-16 fighter jets are complex to work on, they are not the average aircraft that can be learned in a matter of weeks. It can take months for pilots to learn how to fly these birds. European and US officials have the concern that Ukrainian forces could potentially use the jets to fly into Russian airspace and launch attacks on Russian soil.

Western allies are trying to avoid such a provocation, because that could lead to nuclear warfare in reference to what Putin has said he would do to defend his country.

 

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