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Tunnel To Towers Member Explains The Importance Of Reading Victim Names On 9/11 Memorial

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Friday marks 19 years since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, when Al Qaeda terrorist flew planes into New York City’s Twin Towers, the Pentagon, and a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It’s a day that changed this country and the lives of many Americans.

For Kathy Cunningham, a Tunnel to Towers board member and sister of a 9/11 victim, this day is a time to remember her brother Donald W. Robertson. Robertson was working in the North Tower of the World Trade Center that day.

Cunningham and others were upset to hear that because of the COVID-19 epidemic, the official World Trade Center memorial ceremony wouldn’t allow the traditional live reading of victim names. Tunnel to Towers Foundation, however, stepped in and decided to hold their own ceremony to read the names aloud.

“Well, I can’t lie. I was exceedingly disappointed,” Cunningham told Fox & Friends host Ainsley Earhardt. “I come here every year. This is hallowed grounds, this is sacred grounds, this is all we have, I mean we never recovered my brother, so when I come here and I read his name it is cathartic, it is healing. And I love to be around the other families as well. We all share that same hole in our hearts.”

“So when I heard that the names weren’t being read, I was disappointed. I didn’t understand it because I have to give kudos to the memorial and the mayor and everybody that put on a good show, with Mayor Bloomberg,” she said.

“They put on a good show every year over at the memorial,” Cunningham added.”It was seamless…. so when they eliminated that, I was really disappointed and when Frank Siller… when he picked up the ball and ran with that, I was so proud to be a part of this.”

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Kyle Rittenhouse Found ‘Not Guilty’ On All Counts

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Rittenhouse

After three and a half days of deliberation, the jury acquitted Kyle Rittenhouse on all counts. “Jurors in the polarizing case said they had voted to acquit Rittenhouse, 18, of homicide, attempted homicide and other charges related to the August 2020 shootings in Kenosha, Wisconsin” reports The Washington Post.

Rittenhouse testified during the trial during which he  became so emotional he was unable to speak in between sobs as he attempted to describe the shootings. The judge called a brief recess for Rittenhouse to regain composure.

“I didn’t do anything wrong,” Rittenhouse said on the stand. “I defended myself.”

National Review reports “As the verdict was announced, Rittenhouse, overwhelmed with emotion, burst into tears and dropped to the ground, struggling to breathe. After collecting himself, he embraced the defense counsel who represented him throughout the trial.”

Rittenhouse, who was 17 at the time, shot and killed Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, and Anthony Huber, 26, and injured Gaige Grosskreutz, who was 26 at the time. Rittenhouse testified that he fired in self-defense and pleaded not guilty to all counts.

National Review reports:

“Rittenhouse was arrested on August 26, 2020, after shooting three people during the riots that followed the police killing of Jacob Blake, a black man who was brandishing a knife and in the process of violating a restraining order when police arrived on scene.

He was initially indicted on charges of first-degree intentional homicide, first-degree reckless homicide, attempted first-degree intentional reckless homicide, failure to comply with an emergency order from a local government, and possession of a dangerous weapon.”

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