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Trump said he requested 10k National Guardsmen at the Capitol on Jan. 6

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Former President Donald Trump joined Fox News’ “The Next Revolution with Steve Hilton” Sunday night to discuss the miscommunication that may have led to the deadly Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection.

Trump told host Steve Hilton that he personally alerted the Department of Defense days before the rally that the crowd was going to be much larger than anticipated.

“I requested, I said, ‘look this rally is going to be bigger than anyone thinks, because everyone I’d see said, ‘oh we’re going to be at the rally, we’re going to be at the rally.” I think it was the largest crowd I’ve ever spoken before and I’ve spoken to very big crowds,” Trump said.

Moreover, Trump told the Defense Department to have 10,000 national guardsmen ready to deploy. From what Trump understood, that number was passed along to leaders at the Capitol and was rejected because Capitol leaders did not like the idea of 10,000 troops at the Capitol.

“I said, I think you should 10,000… I definitely gave the number of 10,000 national guardsmen. I think you should have 10,000 of the national guard ready. They took that number, from what I understand, and they gave it to the people at the Capitol – which is controlled by Pelosi – and I heard they rejected it because it didn’t look good.”

“So, you know, that was a big mistake,” Trump added.

Trump also told Hilton that he hated to watch what happened at the Capitol but said there’s a double standard between the Capitol riot and “all these other places burning with Antifa and the radical left.”

“I hate to see it, I think it’s terrible, I hate to see it. I will tell you, I think it’s very interesting, however, when you see Washington burning and when you see Seattle burning and Portland burning and all these other places burning with Antifa and the radical left, nothing seems to happen, nobody seems to be bothered by that, and I hate to see that difference but I hated to see that sight at the Capitol, I hate to see all of that. But it is a double standard.”

“I do hate to see that double standard,” Trump said. “I think it’s very unfair.”

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Rep. Patrick McHenry Announces Retirement, Adding to Congressional Exodus

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Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., has declared that he will not seek re-election, becoming the latest in a growing list of lawmakers departing from Congress. McHenry, a close ally of former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy, stated that he believes “there is a season for everything,” signaling the end of his tenure in the House. Having served since 2005, McHenry is the 37th member of Congress to announce they won’t seek re-election in 2024.

In a statement, McHenry reflected on the significance of the House of Representatives in the American political landscape, calling it the “center of our American republic.” He acknowledged the concerns about the future of the institution due to multiple departures but expressed confidence that new leaders would emerge and guide the House through its next phase.

The departure of McHenry and others comes against the backdrop of political shifts and challenges within the Republican Party. The GOP has faced setbacks in recent elections, including fallout from the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Internal strife and disagreements, exemplified by the rebellion against McCarthy, have characterized the party’s dynamics. The GOP’s approval rating stands at 30%, with a disapproval rating of 66%, reflecting the challenges and divisions within the party.

As McHenry steps aside, questions loom over the fate of open seats in the upcoming election. The nonpartisan Cook Political Report identifies five open House seats as potential Democrat pickup opportunities, while none are listed for the GOP. The departures raise concerns about the party’s unity and ability to navigate the evolving political landscape.

With a total of 20 departing Democratic legislators and 10 Republicans, the changing composition of Congress adds complexity to the political dynamics leading up to the 2024 elections. As McHenry emphasizes a hopeful view of the House’s future, the evolving political landscape will determine the impact of these departures on the balance of power in Congress.

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