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Trump hires two lawyers ahead of impeachment trial

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trump out of hospital

Former President Donald Trump named two new attorneys Sunday to lead his impeachment team ahead of next week’s Senate trial.

It was revealed Saturday that Trump had parted ways with his former set of attorneys. Attorneys David Schoen and Bruce L Castor will now lead Trump’s new legal team.

Trump’s office said in a statement, “Notably, Schoen has already been working with the 45th President and other advisors to prepare for the upcoming trial, and both Schoen and Castor agree that this impeachment is unconstitutional – a fact 45 Senators voted in agreement with last week.”

Schoen is a world-renowned civil rights and criminal defense attorney, who frequently appears on Fox News. Bruce Castor is a former district attorney in Pennsylvania.

“The strength of our Constitution is about to be tested like never before in our history. It is strong and resilient. A document written for the ages, and it will triumph over partisanship yet again, and always,” Castor said in a statement.

Trump’s trial is set for Feb. 9. Trump’s legal team has until Tuesday to respond to the article of impeachment passed by the House charging him with “incitement of insurrection.”

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Jan. 6 Select Committee Announces Plan to ‘Advance Contempt Proceedings’ Against Mark Meadows

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Mark Meadows
Photo by Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

The January 6th Capital riot saga continues as a Democratic-led Select Committee has confirmed its plans to hold former President Trump’s chief of staff Mark Meadows in criminal contempt. On Tuesday CNN obtained a letter that Mark Meadow’s attorney sent to the January 6 Committee formally announcing he would refuse to continue to cooperate with the probe.

“We agreed to provide thousands of pages of responsive documents and Mr. Meadows was willing to appear voluntarily, not under compulsion of the Select Committee’s subpoena to him, for a deposition to answer questions about non-privileged matters,” attorney George J. Terwilliger III stated in the letter.

“Now actions by the Select Committee have made such an appearance untenable…In short, we now have every indication from the information supplied to us last Friday — upon which Mr. Meadows could expect to be questioned — that the Select Committee has no intention of respecting boundaries concerning Executive Privilege,” Terwilliger added.

Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson (D-MS) wrote a letter dated December 7 announcing its retaliatory actions: “The Select Committee is left with no choice but to advance contempt proceedings and recommend that the body in which Mr. Meadows once served refer him for criminal prosecution.”

CNN reports on the timeline of correspondence between the Select Committee and Mr. Meadows:

Meadows was first subpoenaed by the committee on September 23. On November 12, Meadows failed to appear for a deposition, but on November 22, the committee gave Meadows another opportunity to begin cooperating with the committee by turning over documents and scheduling a new deposition, to which Meadows agreed. But, the day before the scheduled deposition, Meadows, via his lawyer, informed the committee he would not be appearing for the scheduled December 8 deposition and would cease cooperating with the committee.

Prior to Tuesday’s decision to cease cooperating with the committee, Meadows “had turned over approximately 6,000 pages worth of documents to the panel” reports CNN.

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