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Sources: normalization of sex with minors is backed by the UN report

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The normalization of sex with minors is being pushed by legal experts who are backed by the United Nations according to a report published by The International Commission of Jurists, claiming that minors have the right to make decisions on sex that best benefits them.

In the report titled “The 8 March Principles for a Human Rights-Based Approach to Criminal Law Proscribing Conduct Associated with Sex, Reproduction, Drug Use, HIV, Homelessness and Poverty,” it states:

In this context, the enforcement of criminal law should reflect the rights and capacity of persons under 18 years of age to make decisions about engaging in consensual sexual conduct and their right to be heard in matters concerning them.

Furthermore it stated, “Pursuant to their evolving capacities and progressive autonomy, persons under 18 years of age should participate in decisions affecting them, with due regard to their age, maturity and best interests, and with specific attention to non-discrimination guarantees.”

The report clearly condones the right that a minor has to participate in sexual actions based on what they feel is best for them. According to the National Institute of Health, the brain continues to develop into a person’s 20’s and the fine tuning stages of the brain happen during their teen years. If this is the case, and many countries such as The United States of America have age based law due to the development and decision making of oneself and age, the UN is complicit in allowing children who are developing, to consent to decisions, un-knowingly and without the self-awareness, that could lead them to being taken advantage of and abused in a way that could scar them for the rest of their lives.

Moreover, retired Judge Edwin Cameron of the Constitutional Court of South Africa wrote in the pretext of the report,

From long years in the law, and as a proudly gay man, I know profoundly how criminal law signals which groups are deemed worthy of protection — and which of condemnation and ostracism,”  “In this way, the criminal law performs an expressive function — and it has dramatic consequences on people’s lives. It sometimes entails a harshly discriminatory impact on groups identified with the disapproved or stigmatized conduct.

According to Fox News, the group says that the report, was “developed over a five-year consultative process, following an initial expert meeting of jurists convened in 2018 by the ICJ — together with the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) — to discuss the role of jurists in addressing the detrimental human rights impact of certain criminal laws.” They continued to say,  “The process of elaboration … included expert jurists, academics, legal practitioners, human rights defenders and various civil society organizations working in diverse legal traditions.”

Follow Alexander Carter on Twitter for more stories and updates @AlexCarterDC

 

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Healthcare

College to begin offering abortion pill on campus

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Barnard College, a partner campus of Columbia University, will be rolling out a plan in May that involves supplying students with abortion pills, the Columbia Spectator reported. The plan to provide the abortion service in the form of mifepristone abortion pills to students was initially announced in the fall of 2022 after the overturning of Roe. V Wade, according to the Spectator. However, the rollout’s delay has been partially attributed to an August 2023 grant the college received, which allowed Barnard to join a large network of primary care providers that will help steer the college through the procedures.

The Daily Caller News Foundation reports Barnard’s Primary Care Health Service will host student focus groups in upcoming weeks to find out student perspectives about the service and to identify new ways to support students considering abortion. “We wanted to make sure that we’re addressing this from every angle that will be supportive of students,” Sarah Ann Anderson-Burnett, director of Medical Services and Quality Improvement of Barnard, told the Spectator. Anderson-Burnett also said it has expanded the availability of its abortion providers to after-hours and year-round.

Barnard has six medical professionals, including two physicians and four nurse practitioners, who are capable of performing the procedure, Mariana Catallozzi, vice president for Health and Wellness and chief health officer of Barnard, told the Spectator. The school also launched a partnership with AccessNurse, a medical call center that will assist with patient concerns related to abortions.

“The training doesn’t end with the clinicians,” Anderson-Burnett told the Spectator. “Clinicians are trained on the actual provision, but there’s also an overall training that will be provided to key partners and stakeholders across the campus because we want every step, every touchpoint, to be supportive and to be trauma-informed and to be patient-valued and centered but also respect confidentiality and privacy.”

The University of Massachusetts Amherst spent more than $650,000 to stock abortion pills in March 2023 at the request of Democratic Maryland Gov. Maura Healey. Democratic New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a bill in May 2023 forcing college in the state to stock abortion pills on campus.

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