Connect with us

Healthcare

South Dakota To Be First State To Conduct Hydroxychloroquine Trials

Published

on

South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem announced Monday that her state will be the first to conduct clinical trials of hydroxychloroquine, a drug hailed by many doctors and patients as a miracle solution in the fight against an invisible enemy, the coronavirus.

“From day one, I’ve said we’re going to let the science, facts, and data drive our decision-making in South Dakota. Throughout last week, I communicated with White House officials to let them know that South Dakota’s medical community was ready to step up and lead the way on research efforts,” Noem said in Monday’s press release.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1241367245143642113

Her statement continued, “I made direct requests to President Trump and Vice President Pence to supply us with enough hydroxychloroquine so that it could be made available for every hospitalized person the state may have as well as for those healthcare workers on the frontlines and those in the most vulnerable populations.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized the emergency use of hydroxychloroquine last month after it showed promising results of recovery in early clinical trials. The anti-malaria pill, coupled with the antibiotic azithromycin, has since been used to treat many patients diagnosed with the coronavirus.

South Dakota will soon test the drug on a larger scale with the help of Sanford Health, Avera and Monument Health. The three providers will treat up to 100,000 coronavirus patients, healthcare workers and anyone else with high-risk of exposure to the virus, according to the press release.

The state currently has 868 confirmed cases of the virus and has seen six deaths.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Healthcare

College to begin offering abortion pill on campus

Published

on

School desk

Barnard College, a partner campus of Columbia University, will be rolling out a plan in May that involves supplying students with abortion pills, the Columbia Spectator reported. The plan to provide the abortion service in the form of mifepristone abortion pills to students was initially announced in the fall of 2022 after the overturning of Roe. V Wade, according to the Spectator. However, the rollout’s delay has been partially attributed to an August 2023 grant the college received, which allowed Barnard to join a large network of primary care providers that will help steer the college through the procedures.

The Daily Caller News Foundation reports Barnard’s Primary Care Health Service will host student focus groups in upcoming weeks to find out student perspectives about the service and to identify new ways to support students considering abortion. “We wanted to make sure that we’re addressing this from every angle that will be supportive of students,” Sarah Ann Anderson-Burnett, director of Medical Services and Quality Improvement of Barnard, told the Spectator. Anderson-Burnett also said it has expanded the availability of its abortion providers to after-hours and year-round.

Barnard has six medical professionals, including two physicians and four nurse practitioners, who are capable of performing the procedure, Mariana Catallozzi, vice president for Health and Wellness and chief health officer of Barnard, told the Spectator. The school also launched a partnership with AccessNurse, a medical call center that will assist with patient concerns related to abortions.

“The training doesn’t end with the clinicians,” Anderson-Burnett told the Spectator. “Clinicians are trained on the actual provision, but there’s also an overall training that will be provided to key partners and stakeholders across the campus because we want every step, every touchpoint, to be supportive and to be trauma-informed and to be patient-valued and centered but also respect confidentiality and privacy.”

The University of Massachusetts Amherst spent more than $650,000 to stock abortion pills in March 2023 at the request of Democratic Maryland Gov. Maura Healey. Democratic New York Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a bill in May 2023 forcing college in the state to stock abortion pills on campus.

Continue Reading

Trending