Sergei Millian is not in hiding. Even if he was, he isn’t any longer. He reached out to SaraACarter.com on Tuesday to dispute a recent podcast interview with a famous British historian who accused him of possibly being connected to Russia’s GRU, Moscow’s military intelligence. He called the allegations outlandish and accused historian Nigel West of attempting to spread disinformation about him, much like former British spy Christopher Steele did about the Trump campaign.

Millian, an American citizen born in Belarus, was believed to be an unwitting source, in Steele’s infamous and now-debunked dossier. But lawmakers and some intelligence experts have more questions than answers when it comes to Millian. They say Millian is the only one that can provide clarity on what exactly happened during his time with Steele.

On Monday, this reporter interviewed West on The Sara Carter Show podcast. He stated that he believed, based on Millian’s own past statements in open-source media, that he could be linked to Russian intelligence.

Shortly after the podcast and story were posted, Millian reached out to this reporter to dispute West’s assertions saying emphatically that the information is “one-hundred percent false.”

“Nigel West so far gave 100% false information about me in his last public interview in London (where he claimed I was PSS),” Millian told me. “Now, he doubled on from the first lie and there is not an ounce of truth what he claims. He is an out of his mind crazy, deranged man. I’m not kidding. Ask him to provide proof of any of his false rumors and wild innuendoes. USSR disbanded when I was still a teenager. The big question is why West, out of London, lies about me, an AMERICAN citizen, so much just like Steele before West? Is it coordinated and what’s their plan?”

But a mystery still surrounds Millian and senior U.S. lawmakers are seeking to interview him. Ranking Republican of the House Intelligence Committee Devin Nunes has said he wishes to interview the mysterious Millian.

Nunes told Maria Bartiromo on Fox New’s Sunday Morning Futures at the end of April, that his investigators zeroed in on three Russian Americans during their probe of the FBI’s handling of its Crossfire Hurricane investigation into the Trump campaign.

He said Millian was the most important figure in recent information released by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz. 

“Because of new information that has come out because of the Horowitz report that’s declassified that we’ve been talking about for a long time and the FISAs, we now are targeting what appear to be three Russian-Americans,” Nunes said. “I think the most important one is somebody that we actually asked to come to our committee named Sergei Millian. He is hiding somewhere around the globe — we don’t know exactly what country he’s in. But we really would like Sergei to come forward and talk to us because, either he was, you know, working for Fusion GPS and the Clinton campaign and dirtying up Trump people, or it’s quite possible that he may have been framed.”

This reporter does not have information as to Millian’s whereabouts but was able to confirm the authenticity of his message. Millian did not respond to questions regarding Nunes and whether or not he’d speak to the committee, however, there are a number of intelligence sources that believe Millian may have been framed by Steele.

In the podcast broadcast Monday, West claimed that the Russian disinformation pointed out in the recent declassification of the footnotes in DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s report may have been directly linked to Sergei Millian. He noted that Millian is Steele’s only real identifiable source in his report. He also said Millian may have had ties in his early life to Russia’s GRU, Moscow’s military intelligence, by his own admission.

Millian disputes everything West said to this reporter about him. I have transcribed some of the West interview below from a recent article:

“There does appear to have been at least one Russian source for Chris,” said West, referring to Millian. West said the problem with Millian is when you look into his background.

“He dances around the proposition that he may have himself worked for a Soviet intelligence organization,” said West. “When you look back at his career, he acknowledges publicly and is quite sort of entertained by the idea that when he did his compulsory military service for two years in the Soviet Union, he did the military interpreters course in English. And that is run by the GRU, Soviet military intelligence.”

“So there is no question by his own admission that he had a relationship with the GRU,” said West. “Whether that can continue in play to life is a matter of speculation whether he had any kind of a relationship with them one doesn’t know. But he is in Russia now and is not answering his cell phone.”

This reporter has now sent Millian’s question to West. We will update this story as soon as West responds.