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Sen. Loeffler to object to Electoral College vote certification on Jan. 6, joining vocal group of GOP senators

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Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R) on Monday the day before the runoff race for her U.S. Senate seat, announced that she would object during Congress’ Wednesday certification of all the states’ Electoral College votes, joining about a dozen other current and incoming Republican senators who have stated they will take part in the effort to overturn President-elect Joe Biden‘s 2020 win.

Her Republican colleague, Sen. David Perdue, is also facing a runoff election for his seat on Tuesday. Both races will determine which political party controls the Senate for likely the next few years. If Democrats squeak out victories in both runoffs, they will control 50 of the upper chamber’s 100 seats and have Vice President-elect Kamala Harris as the tie-breaking vote. Tuesday’s election results will have major bearing over how much of Biden and the Democrats’ agenda during the 117th Congress can be realized.

MORE ON GEORGIA: High-ranking federal prosecutor in Georgia resigns, day after leaked Trump-Raffensperger call

“Elections are the bedrock of our democracy and the American people deserve to be 100% confident in our election systems and its outcomes,” she said in a statement to Fox News on Monday night. “But right now, tens of millions of Americans have real concerns about the way in which the November Presidential election was conducted—and I share their concerns.”

“The American people deserve a platform in Congress, permitted under the Constitution, to have election issues presented so that they can be addressed,” Loeffler continued. “That’s why, on January 6th, I will vote to give President Trump and the American people the fair hearing they deserve and support the objection to the Electoral College certification process.”

MORE ON CERTIFICATION: DC Mayor mobilizes National Guard ahead of protests against Jan. 6 electoral vote certification

Back on December 14, all 50 states and the District of Columbia cast their official Electoral College votes, solidifying Biden’s 2020 victory.

According to a Sunday explainer piece from The Wall Street Journal, it takes one House representative and one senator to file an objection to a state’s electoral votes. For each objection to a given state’s electoral votes, lawmakers from each chamber break for two hours at most to debate the objection. When debate concludes, a straightforward majority vote is held on the objection, and both the House and Senate must agree in order for the objection to succeed.

The effort led by GOP Sens. Josh Hawley (Mo.) and Ted Cruz (TX) to object to certain swing states’ Electoral College votes is widely expected to fail, with experts viewing it as a longshot. They are also joined by a sizable contingent of House Republicans in their effort.

One of those House GOP members, Rep. Jody Hice (Ga.), on Tuesday joined Loeffler in announcing he’d object on Wednesday.

“This isn’t partisan politics. We’re fighting for election integrity,” he argued. “We have a clear constitutional duty to defend the sacred trust of the electoral process.”

More current Republican senators who have said they’d object during certification are Sens. Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.), Ron Johnson (Wis.), James Lankford (Okla.), Steve Daines (Mont.), John Kennedy (La.), and Mike Braun (Ind.). Senators-elect who have pledged to object, too, include Cynthia Lummis (Wyo.), Roger Marshall (Kan.), Bill Haggerty (Tenn.), Tommy Tuberville (Ala.).

President Donald Trump, who still refuses to concede to Biden, has been openly urging congressional Republicans to object on Wednesday. He has even placed pressure on Vice President Mike Pence, who that day oversees the counting of the official electoral votes cast by the states, to help overturn Biden’s victory.

“I hope that Mike Pence comes through for us,” the president said at a Monday night rally in Georgia to cheers. “He’s a great guy. Of course if he doesn’t come through, I won’t like him quite as much.”

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Biden’s Poor Polling and Harris’ Low Electability Rating Could Have Democrats Considering ‘Nuclear Option’

Behind-the-scenes discussion of how Democrats could arrive at a third option for the next election is underway

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Biden Kamala
Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With polls consistently showing a poor approval rating for President Joe Biden at below 40 percent, and a recent poll put Kamala Harris’ electability at only 28 percent, Democrats are in full panic mode.

Behind-the-scenes discussion of how Democrats could arrive at a third option for the next election is underway. Operatives are preparing for the possibility of a contested presidential primary in which other would-be nominees take on Ms. Harris, but that could be damaging for the party” reports the Telegraph.

Therefore, Democrats are allegedly whispering about a potential “nuclear option” that would call for current Vice President Harris to be nominated to the Supreme Court. The Telegraph writes that “while the scenario is highly improbable, and perhaps a reflection of a Washington rumor mill in overdrive, the fact it has come up at all shows the depths of the predicament the Biden administration currently finds itself in, amid rising inflation, a stalled domestic agenda, and foreign policy disasters.”

The theory in question would call for President Biden to nominate Harris to the Supreme Court in the event a seat opens in the next three years during his administration. Biden could then use “Section 2 of the 25thAmendment to nominate a more popular vice president”, adds the Telegraph.

Under Section 1 of the 25th Amendment, that new vice president could assume the presidency if Biden were to step down while president. They would then become the Democratic nominee in the 2024 presidential election. That same individual could also be the presumptive Democratic nominee in 2024 if Biden chooses not to run for re-election.

One piece of information that is wetting Democrats’ whistle is that current Supreme Court Justice Breyer has said he does not “want to stay on the Supreme Court until I die.”

The Telegraph notes that “the discussion over potential successors to Mr. Biden is highly unusual less than a year into an administration.”

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