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Sen. Kelly Loeffler Denies Insider Trading Allegations, Fails Again To Name Stock Manager

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Senator Kelly Loeffler, R-GA, is continuing to deny allegations of insider trading surrounding stocks she sold before the coronavirus hit the U.S. markets and failed to answer questions regarding who manages those stocks, during an interview Wednesday with Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo.

Related:

Sen. Loeffler’s ‘peek-a-boo trust’ Raising Speculation As She Refuses To Name Broker

“I have not profited. I never sought to profit from my position at the Senate. I’m here to serve all Georgians. In fact, I donate my paycheck to good charities around Georgia doing hard work serving our citizens,” Loeffler told Bartiromo.

She added, “I went to the Senate after a nearly three-decade career in the private sector, in financial services, where I conducted myself with the highest levels of integrity. Third party managers manage all of our investments. I have no communication with them. And this is cherry-picking for dates and times around events that are completely unrelated to my investment manager’s decisions or any meetings or communications I have had.”

Loeffler recently sold $46,027 worth of stock in the online travel company Booking Holdings just before President Donald Trump banned travel to most of Europe, according to Sara A. Carter’s reporting. That sale was in addition to what she sold $18.7 million in stocks she sold during February and March.

Allegations of insider trading began to surface when Loeffler purchased stocks that would perform well in a pandemic. For example, she invested in DuPont, which manufactures COVID-19 protective garments and Citrix, a telecom company.

Of her purchases, Loeffler told Bartiromo that the decisions were made by third party managers and that she “had no involvement in and had nothing to do with any meetings I’m in.”

Dan McLagan, the spokesman for Rep. Doug Collins’ campaign, Loeffler’s opponent in the upcoming Senate race, told Sara A. Carter that Loeffler’s inability to answer key questions, including answering to the identity of her stock broker, is concerning.

“Loeffler apparently has a ‘peek-a-boo trust’ rather than a blind one,” said McLagan. “She’s more concerned about her personal profit than the little people she represents with their petty worries about illness, late mortgages and cratered retirement plans.”

When asked by Carter, Loeffler denied any knowledge of the transactions and said that she’s only “notified of transactions after they occur.” Loeffler, however, failed to answer the following questions Carter sent to her office:

  • What type of third party broker does Sen. Loeffler have?
  • Who is the broker? Is there a an advisor between the broker and Sen. Loeffler?
  • Why not a ‘qualified blind trust?’
  • Questions regarding her shares of Booking Holdings are now public – according to her report of shares sold and purchased- On March 6 purchased Booking Holding -she was with President Trump at the CDC when it purchased. Then days later March 10-11, Sen. Loeffler sold off $46,027 (this was just before President Trump restricted Travel from Europe to the United States? Can you explain why these shares were sold so soon after?
  • What is a general comment you can provide to constituents about the situation that you are now in and what can be done to prevent this from happening again?
  • Would you have done anything differently?
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Economy

Illegal migrants refuse to leave Denver encampments, make demands of city including ‘fresh, culturally appropriate’ food and free lawyers

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A group of illegal immigrants in Denver is not only refusing to leave encampments, but also have the audacity to take no actions until the city meets its demands. The migrants were organized enough to publish a document with 13 specific demands before they “acquiesce to Denver Human Services’ request to leave the encampments and move to more permanent shelters funded by the city” reports Fox News.

Demands were made following the Denver government obtaining a petition to have the migrants moved, according to the outlet. The Denver mayor has been under pressure from the city’s ongoing migrant crisis, making headlines and receiving stiff backlash earlier this year for proposing budget cuts to the city’s government, including cuts to the city’s police force, to fund more money for dealing with the city’s migrant crisis.

The list of demands was sent to Mayor Mike Johnston and included requests for provisions of “fresh, culturally appropriate” food, no time limits on showers and free immigration lawyers, the outlet reported. Further details of the demands read, “Migrants will cook their own food with fresh, culturally appropriate ingredients provided by the City instead of premade meals – rice, chicken, flour, oil, butter, tomatoes, onions, etc… Shower access will be available without time limits & can be accessed whenever… Medical professional visits will happen regularly & referrals/connections for specialty care will be made as needed.”

The migrants also insisted they get “connection to employment support, including work permit applications for those who qualify,” as well as “Consultations for each person/family with a free immigration lawyer.” The migrants insisted that if these are not met, they will not leave their tent community.

“At the end of the day, what we do not want is families on the streets of Denver,” Jon Ewing, a spokesman for Denver Human Services, told Fox 31.

The current encampment is situated “near train tracks and under a bridge,” Fox 31 noted, adding that it has been there for the last couple of weeks.

Ewing told Fox 31 the city just wants “to get families to leave that camp and come inside,” noting its offer will give migrants “three square meals a day” and the freedom to cook.

He also said the government is willing to work with people to compromise and help them figure out what kind of assistance they qualify for.

Ultimately, Ewing said, the city wants to work with migrants to determine, “What might be something that is a feasible path for you to success that is not staying on the streets of Denver?”

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