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Second human case of bird flu, first in U.S. found in Colorado

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A man whose name has not been released became the first person in the United States to test positive for the latest strain of the bird flu. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) made the announcement on Thursday, stating the man is under 40-years-old and tested positive for the H5 variant.

“This is the second human case associated with this specific group of H5 viruses that are currently predominant, and the first case in the United States,” said the CDC in a press release.

The patient is an inmate at a state correctional facility, and it was determined that the infection occurred due to exposure at a commercial farm in Montrose County, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

The inmate was working as part of a pre-release employment program. The state health department said the affected flock was identified, euthanized and disposed of as required by federal guidelines.

The Washington Examiner reports:

The first case of bird flu in a human occurred in December 2021, when a man in the United Kingdom tested positive for the H5 bird flu. He did not have any symptoms and raised birds who became infected with the virus.

The CDC emphasized that the case does not change the “low” human risk assessment for the general public.

The bird flu has had a significant effect on the agricultural economy, with the current variant wiping out more than 25 million birds as of April 2.

 

 

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  1. Stephane

    May 6, 2022 at 4:54 am

    Thanks to FAUX-XI, the “””JAB”””, with the graphene, the spike protein, and other surprises, will make the people getting infected by ANY kind of such disease, succumb to the respiratory failure which will come in soon after the infection. With NO WAY to destroy the virus culprit of the infection.
    Thank you FAUX-XI.

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Healthcare

TN Republican introduces legislation to fight opioid shipments into U.S.

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Tennessee Republican Representative Diana Harshbarger is attempting to fight the opioid crisis and epidemic through new legislation. Introduced Friday, Harshbarger told the Daily Caller:

The Daily Caller first obtained a copy of the legislation, which addresses what Harshbarger calls a “loophole.” The legislation amends the Controlled Substances Act to specifically require registrants to investigate reports of suspicious orders of controlled substances and halt them if necessary. Under the version of the act currently in force, drug manufacturers and distributors are only required to report suspicious orders of opioids and other controlled substances to the DEA.

“Breaking the opioid epidemic’s stranglehold on our nation is one of my foremost priorities. In an effort to do so, my colleagues and I have identified a loophole that allows distributors to continue order fulfillment, even under suspicious circumstances.”

“My bill closes that loophole with the requirements and guardrails needed to ensure these addictive and potentially dangerous drugs do not fall into the wrong hands while the DEA investigates. The future of our nation depends on us solving the addiction crisis, and this is a step towards that outcome” Harshbarger continued.

The Daily Caller reports:

According to a congressional report released in September, the opioid crisis cost the U.S. $1.5 trillion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CDC says 93,331 people died from overdoses in the U.S. in 2020, the highest in 50 years. Opioid-related deaths made up nearly three-quarters of the total.

Pharmaceutical companies have been blamed for contributing to the opioid epidemic. The Department of Justice is currently suing the pharmaceutical company AmerisourceBergen over allegations the company failed to report suspicious orders of opioids to federal law enforcement.

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