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SCOTUS: Speaking your mind is still allowed in America

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[brid autoplay=”true” video=”691115″ player=”23886″ title=”Rep.%20Biggs%20The%20fight%20for%20freedom%20must%20be%20fought%20at%20the%20polls%20in%20Georgia” duration=”3296″ description=”Sara is joined by House Freedom Caucus Chairman Rep. Andy Biggs, who says the fight for freedom must be fought by voters in the upcoming Senate elections in Georgia. Biggs also slams liberal leaders who have acted as tyrants but don’t actually follow their own lockdown orders.” uploaddate=”2020-12-14″ thumbnailurl=”//cdn.brid.tv/live/partners/18168/thumb/691115_t_1607968027.png” contentUrl=”//cdn.brid.tv/live/partners/18168/sd/691115.mp4″]


By Jenny Goldsberry

The Supreme Court of the United States voted eight to one in favor of a high school cheerleader, saying it was against her first amendment rights to kick her off of the squad for using profane language off campus. The school suspended then sophomore Brandy Levy for saying “”F— school f— softball f— cheer f— everything,” in a Snapchat.

While the Mahanoy Area School District in Pennsylvania has strict regulations within the school, the justices agreed that to include students’ language off-campus is extreme. In the majority opinion, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote that a regulation that strict would “include all the speech a student utters during the full 24-hour day. That means courts must be more skeptical of a school’s efforts to regulate off-campus speech, for doing so may mean the student cannot engage in that kind of speech at all.” That effort obviously infringes on one’s right to free speech.

“It might be tempting to dismiss B. L.’s words as unworthy of the robust First Amendment protections discussed herein,” Breyer wrote. “But sometimes it is necessary to protect the superfluous in order to preserve the necessary.”

Justice Clarence Thomas was the only one who dissented. He claimed that it is the school’s have a right to discipline their students. “When students are on campus, the majority says, schools have authority in loco parentis—that is, as
substitutes of parents—to discipline speech and conduct,” Thomas wrote. The majority Justices agreed with that premise, but Thomas claimed that they were veering from precedent.

“A more searching review reveals that schools historically could discipline students in circumstances like those presented here,” Thomas wrote.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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DOJ charges eleven pro-life protesters ‘aided and abetted by one another’

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Eleven pro-life protesters were charged with violating federal law by the Department of Justice Wednesday for blocking abortion clinics. The individuals, “aided and abetted by one another, used force and physical obstruction to injure, intimidate, and interfere with employees of the clinic and a patient who was seeking reproductive health services” said the DOJ.

According to a summary of the indictment, seven of the demonstrators were charged with conspiracy against rights secured by the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances (FACE) Act, which prohibits obstructing the entrance to an abortion facility. The remaining four were charged with violating the legislation.

Pro-life activist AJ Hurley told Live Action News  the FBI raided the home of Chester Gallagher, the organizer of the protest and one of the accused conspirators, on Tuesday with guns drawn. He said Gallagher’s neighbors told him Gallagher was out of state when the FBI showed up and entered his home.

National Review reports that Hurley also told Live Action News that the FBI reportedly recently called a few of the charged individuals to tell them they had arrest warrants and that they must turn themselves in. If convicted, those charged with conspiracy could face up to eleven years in prison and fines up to $250,000, the DOJ confirmed.

National Review writes:

Gallagher allegedly advertised a series of pro-life events on social media for March 2021 in the Nashville area. The indictment claims he and other coordinators recruited participants to travel to the city and erect a blockade, which Gallagher allegedly called a “rescue,” at Carafem Health Center Clinic in Mount Juliet, Tenn., to prevent pregnant women from pursuing abortions.

A livestream of the stand-in shows activists chanting and singing prayer up the stairs to and along the hallway outside the abortion clinic, located in an office complex. Police officers eventually appeared in the video urging them to take their protest outside to the sidewalk.

“This is not allowed guys. Asking you to leave the property or I will call the police,” a security guard can be heard saying. The indictment alleges that the group prevented a patient and an employee from entering the facility. After they refused to leave the premises, the activists were reportedly escorted away to jail by police on misdemeanor trespassing charges. One pro-life activist wroteon March 6, 2021, on Facebook the claim that one “rescuer” was held on $1,000 bail, six, including Gallagher, on $1,500 bail, and two on $2,500 bail.

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