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SCOTUS leaves Texas abortion law alone, opening the door for stricter abortion laws nationwide

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By Jenny Goldsberry

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s abortion law, banning all abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected, or about six weeks. Their decision came just before midnight Wednesday.

Ruling 5-4, all liberal judges, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, Stephen Breyer but also including John Roberts were in the minority. Sotomayor railed against the “flagrantly unconstitutional law” in her opinion. It took them roughly 72 hours to rule.

“The Court’s decision is stunning,” Sotomayor wrote. “A majority of Justices have opted to bury their heads in the sand.”

But the order had nothing to do with the constitutionality of the law. “In reaching this conclusion, we stress that we do not purport to resolve definitively any jurisdictional or substantive claim in the applicants’ lawsuit. In particular, this order is not based on any conclusion about the constitutionality of Texas’s law, and in no way limits other procedurally proper challenges to the Texas law, including in Texas state courts,” the order read. The majority opted to issue an order without signatures rather than write opinions on the matter.

Abbott celebrated his law going into effect Wednesday before he even knew the ruling from the Court. “Starting today, every unborn child with a heartbeat will be protected from the ravages of abortion,” Abbott tweeted. “Texas will always defend the right to life.”

Meanwhile, the plaintiff in this case, Whole Woman’s Health, tweeted that there is still “so much to do.”

“We. Are. Not. Going. Anywhere.,” their tweet read.

Whole Woman’s Health remained open and functioning outside the new law until midnight Wednesday.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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