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Scott Atlas resigns, defends keeping schools open: ‘I was just speaking about the data’

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scott atlas

Dr. Scott Atlas, President Trump’s coronavirus adviser, formally resigned from his position on Monday and joined Tucker Carlson Tonight later in the day to give his first interview after his departure from the White House.

Atlas joined the White House Coronavirus Task Force in August and sparked controversy for his opinions on keeping schools open and suggesting that residents of Michigan should “rise up” against COVID-19 restrictions imposed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

Atlas was a member of the Coronavirus Task Force for 130 days and will now become a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

“The point isn’t that I was right,” Atlas said while discussing the reopening of New York City schools on Carlson’s show. “The point isn’t that the advice I gave the president was right. The point isn’t that the president was right, although those things are true.”

“The point is that we really need to open up in-person schools ASAP because it’s so destructive, so harmful to children,” Atlas added. “And there’s really nothing more important for a country that I can think of than educating our children, of course.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, infectious disease expert, has recently announced the spread of coronavirus among children at schools is very low.

Earlier this month, Fauci said he “totally disagrees” with Atlas regarding the closures of businesses and schools in Michigan in response to COVID-19.

“I don’t want to say anything against Dr. Atlas as a person, but I totally disagree with the stand he takes. I just do, period,” Fauci said on NBC’s “Today.”

Atlas noted that the data regarding school closures and the infection risk in children has not changed.

“I was just speaking about the data as I always did, and its true that the data was correct then. Children have extremely low risk of a serious illness and do not frequently spread this infection,” Atlas said. “That was known then and we also knew the harms, the serious harm, to children from closing in-person schools. Nothing’s really changed. It’s just that some of these things are know being acknowledged.”

Atlas ended the interview by emphasizing the importance of free exchange of ideas.

“I think there’s a serious problem, honestly, in the country because there’s a bigger issue here, and it is that America and its universities really need to allow — without attack, without rebuke, without intimidation — the free exchange of ideas, because it is from the free exchange of ideas that scientific truths follow,” he said.

“And these scientific truths are critical for us to solve this crisis, every other crisis and in fact, the free exchange of ideas is honestly the foundation of every civilized society,” Atlas added. “Science has been politicized and it’s very, very dangerous. I think we should all be concerned about it.”

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New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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