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Scalise: Pelosi’s ‘wasted her speakership on’ trying to remove Pres. Trump

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House Minority Whip Steve Scalise says the reason House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is moving to invoke the 25th amendment to remove President Donald Trump from office comes from her lack of confidence in former Vice President and Democratic Presidential nominee Joe Biden’s ability to govern and her inability to negotiate a bipartisan COVID-19 relief bill for the American people, he revealed on “Fox & Friends” Friday morning.

“This shows you just how misplaced Speaker Pelosi’s priorities are,” Scalise said. “We should be in Washington helping families that are struggling and recovering, small businesses that would love another round of Paycheck Protection Program funding, where there’s massive bipartisan support for Rep. Chabot’s bill to give another round of PPP funding. That could be passed tomorrow, but she’s not bringing us back for that.”

Pelosi signaled Thursday that she plans to move forward with establishing a Commission on Presidential Capacity. She and Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) announced the move in a press release. The move would likely die in the Republican-controlled Senate, which Scalise said she knows would happen.

“She has been fixated for the last four years with overturning the results of the last election. Here she is again, on the heels of Vice President Pence winning handily a debate against Kamala Harris. She’s now trying to overturn the results of next month’s election. She’s wanted to remove President Trump from office because she doesn’t agree with the people’s choice from the last election,” Scalise explained.

He added, “Look, they started with the Russia hoax, they did impeachment. This is what you spent and wasted her speakership on. She should be fighting for families and small businesses, not trying to overturn the results of the election because she knows how well President Trump’s doing. And, by the way, what a signal that is to Joe Biden that she’s spending her time trying to remove President Trump from office because clearly, she mustn’t have confidence in Joe Biden’s abilities.”

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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