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Sarah Huckabee Sanders announces run for Arkansas governor

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Sarah Sanders

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced Monday that she is running for governor of Arkansas in 2022.

Sanders previously served as White House Press Secretary for President Donald Trump from 2017 to 2019. After departing from her position in June 2019, Trump urged Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas, tweeting, “She would be fantastic.”

In a nearly 8-minute long video released on Twitter Monday morning, Sanders said, “As governor, I will defend your right to be free of socialism and tyranny.”

“Our state needs a leader with the courage to do what’s right, not what’s politically correct or convenient,” she continued.

Sanders is the daughter of former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who served from 1996 to 2007. He was also a candidate for the Republican Party presidential nomination in both 2008 and 2016.

“My dad always said, the real test of a leader is not the way you handle issues you know are coming, it’s rising to the moment in a crisis you could never plan for.”

Sanders hopes to be the first woman governor of Arkansas.

“I was only the third woman, and the first mom to serve as White House Press Secretary,” Sanders said. “With your support, I hope to be the first woman to lead our state as governor.”

Moreover, Sanders vowed to promote law and order, prohibit sanctuary cities, fight back against the green new deal, lower state income tax and create new jobs.

Sanders is seeking to replace current GOP Gov. Asa Hutchinson, who is barred by term limits from running for reelection next year. Sanders will run against Lt. Gov. Tim Griffin and Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge in the Republican primary. No Democrats have formally announced their candidacy.

“I will not retreat, I will not surrender and I will not bow down to the radical left, not now, not ever,” Sanders said. “As governor, I will defend our freedom and lead with heart.”

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New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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