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Sara Carter’s family is ‘doing what the U.S. would not do…we don’t abandon our allies and Americans’

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By Jenny Goldsberry

On the latest episode of the Sara Carter Show, host Sara Carter spoke about the final days of the U.S. military’s presence in Afghanistan. For her family, Afghanistan has been a central part of their lives.

“Our entire lives since September 11, 2001 have been all consumed,” Carter said. “Unfortunately, a lot of it with a war and terror, either covering the war on terror as a journalist, or my husband fighting in the wars overseas trying to target those terrorists that were planning on bringing that terror here to the United States again.”

RELATED: Sara Carter on the emotional aspect of leaving Afghanistan

As a result of the U.S. military leaving, hundreds of thousands of people have left along with them. In a full circle moment, Carter’s family is becoming a host family for a family of Afghan refugees.

“But we do have an Afghan family coming,” Carter said. “A former interpreter who I worked with, and his beautiful little baby boy, and his wife who did make it out. I’m still trying to get the rest of his family. And my husband is actually super thrilled about this.”

Meanwhile, two weeks ago, President Biden met with officials from Kosovo and Albania recently in an attempt to encourage more countries to take in Afghan refugees. However his efforts were in vain. Instead of helping people fleeing Afghanistan, countries hesitated to take them in because they’re concerned about COVID-19 health screenings. So, Carter is proud that she can do her part to help them.

“It was almost as if Marty, my husband, was doing what the United States could not do,” Carter said.

According to Carter, there could be anywhere between 300 to 1500 Americans remaining in Afghanistan. But the last U.S. soldier left Monday.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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Last surviving WW2 Medal of Honor recipient Woody Williams dies at 98

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On this Fourth of July we honor the last surviving Medal of Honor recipient from World War II. Marine veteran Hershel “Woody” Williams died Wednesday at 3:15 a.m. and was 98 years old. Williams died at the Huntington, West Virginia, Veterans Affairs hospital named after him, according to a statement from his foundation.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Sunday that Williams will lie in honor at the U.S. Capitol.

The Marine Corps Times writes about the honorable veteran and his Medal:

Born in 1923 on a dairy farm in Quiet Dell, West Virginia, Williams was the youngest of 11 children, according to the Weirton, West Virginia, Daily Times.

Initially disqualified for being too short, Williams enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1943, according to his biography. The demolition sergeant landed on Iwo Jima on Feb. 21, 1945, with 1st Battalion, 21st Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division.

Two days later, on Feb. 23, 1945, he famously destroyed enemy emplacements with a flamethrower, going forward alone into machinegun fire, covered only by four riflemen.

His citation states, “he fought desperately for 4 hours under terrific enemy small-arms fire and repeatedly returned to his own lines to prepare demolition charges and obtain serviced flamethrowers,” before wiping out one enemy position after another.

On one occasion, he “daringly mounted a pillbox to insert the nozzle of his flamethrower through the air vent,” which killed all enemy occupants and silenced its gun.

Williams received the Medal of Honor from President Harry S. Truman at the White House in October 1945 for “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.”

 

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