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Sara Carter: National Guard in DC ‘are not an enemy’

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Sara Carter spoke to Fox News host Martha MacCallum Monday about comments made by a Democratic congressman that casted doubt over the National Guard’s loyalty as they deploy to the Nation’s Capitol ahead of President-elect Joe Biden‘s Wednesday inauguration.

“The [National] Guard is 90 some-odd percent male, and only about 20% of white males voted for Biden,” Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.) said in a CNN interview earlier on Monday. “You’ve got to figure that in the Guard, which is predominantly more conservative […] they’re probably not more than 25% of the people there protecting us that voted for Biden. The other 75% are in the large class of folks that might want to do something.”

Cohen’s remarks come amid fears among U.S. defense officials that some in the National Guard might launch an insider attack. The FBI is now vetting all Guard troops who will be in Washington, D.C. for the event.

“It’s absolutely divisive and wrong, Martha,” Carter said in response to Cohen’s remarks. “My husband is a wounded war veteran. He pledged allegiance to the Constitution to protect our nation from enemies both foreign and domestic. He gave that pledge just like all the other men and women that fought alongside him in Afghanistan.”

“I also covered the war in Afghanistan,” Carter told host Martha MacCallum. “I saw young men of all colors, of all religions—and women—give their life up for this nation because they believe [in] and love this country.”

Carter’s attention then turned toward the thousands of National Guard troops currently stationed in the nation’s capital, where the number of troops is going to surge up to 25,000 on Inauguration Day from the previous 21,000, the National Guard Bureau said last week. This massive presence of troops in Washington is meant to combat any threats to Biden and his inauguration following a mob storming the U.S. Capitol on January 6 in a deadly siege.

RELATED: Up to 25,000 National Guard troops to be in D.C. on Inauguration Day

“And as for the 21,000 National Guard members that are in Washington, D.C., it’s important to remember that they are doing their job as well. They are not an enemy,” Carter said. “Many of them can’t believe they’re there with their AR-15s guarding the Capitol before inauguration, and on Inauguration Day too, to protect President-elect and President Joe Biden from possible threats within the nation. To say that these men and women, who are there protecting our nation, that 75% of them ‘pose a threat’ to our country because they had a different political party affiliation is absolutely un-American and wrong.”

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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