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Immigration

Sara Carter joins Texas DPS at border, encounters woman stranded by smugglers

Carter called the situation at the southern border ‘extremely dangerous’

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Investigative reporter Sara Carter highlighted the toll illegal immigration is having on migrants themselves Tuesday on “Hannity.”

Carter and the Texas Department of Public Safety flew over Big Bend National Park on Tuesday, where communications shared with them reported a woman had been seen stranded atop a mountain not far from the Mexican border.

The young woman later told Carter she had been left on the mountain by a group of people who promised to return for her but never did.

The reporter noted that the woman would have had to face very tough elements to survive where she was abandoned.

“She’s terrified, she’s crying, and she said there were 27 other people with her,” Carter said.

“There’s all kinds of elements out there that … if she would spend the night out there tonight, it would have dropped into the low 30s [Fahrenheit] — who knows if she would have made it.”

Carter added that the woman’s phone broke moments after she attempted to call authorities for help.

One of the agents Carter accompanied, Lt. Chris Olivarez, later said the case proves how human smuggling organizations in Mexico have no regard for human life.

“They’ll leave a person behind and keep moving on,” he said.

“It’s extraordinarily dangerous times,” Carter later told host Sean Hannity.

“Foreign service allies … are extraordinarily concerned about the national security and basically the porous border here in the United States.”

She later showed Hannity an area where a dead body had been discovered near Eagle Pass – both U.S. and Mexican authorities are trying to decide which country must recover the corpse from the middle of the Rio Grande.

Carter added that Texas Department of Public Safety is overwhelmed with receiving no help from the Biden administration.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. JJ Chester

    April 20, 2022 at 11:25 am

    Why is it that virtually every illegal I see being apprehended is wearing camo? Is it provided by smugglers? I doubt that this is a fashion statement, but a cheap attempt to hide them as they work their way north. In court, this should be considered as evidence of intent to evade the border authorities.

  2. Steve

    April 20, 2022 at 1:42 pm

    I hope you pushed her back across.

  3. Profx

    April 21, 2022 at 10:06 am

    Biden’s Gang encouraging undocumented illegals to cross our borders is the root cause of the misery that both the illegals and our Nation are now facing.
    This is NOT about humanitarianism, it is about tearing down our nation and replacing it with their insane agenda. It is all about power and money in the end.

  4. G. garcia

    April 22, 2022 at 2:37 am

    100000 Ucrainans came no problem. but their whiet
    So smugglerw were cauthg during Rep.era

  5. John

    April 25, 2022 at 12:27 am

    Great reporting and so dangerous for our country.

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Economy

NY Lawmakers want to tax tech giants to get $500M to fund unemployment benefits for illegal migrants

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new york city

New York lawmakers are debating over a proposed Democratic initiative that would pave the way for a multibillion-dollar fund designed to provide unemployment benefits for illegal immigrants. Spearheaded by state Senator Jessica Ramos, a Queens Democrat, the proposal has ignited passionate discussions within the Senate Finance Committee, where it currently awaits further deliberation.

The Center Square reports the proposal would utilize a $500 million trust fund earmarked specifically to offer jobless benefits for individuals who find themselves ineligible for traditional unemployment payments and other public assistance programs. To finance this ambitious endeavor, proponents of the plan are advocating for the imposition of a novel tax targeting tech behemoths like Google and Amazon. This tax, aimed at digital advertising revenue, is projected to generate hundreds of millions of dollars to sustain the fund.

Ramos has alluded to her belief that migrants are a fundamental contribution to the state’s economy. Despite their authorization to work, payment of taxes, and active involvement in the labor force, undocumented immigrants face a glaring disparity—they are excluded from accessing vital safety nets like unemployment benefits if they lose their jobs.

In a social media post, Ramos cited the expiration of federal unemployment insurance for freelancers and the depletion of the Excluded Workers Fund. She argues vehemently for a safety net aligned with the evolving dynamics of the labor market, one that extends support to all workers, regardless of their immigration status.

The proposed fund, aptly named the Unemployment Bridge Program, outlines comprehensive eligibility criteria encompassing a spectrum of marginalized workers—from undocumented migrants to freelancers and individuals recently released from incarceration or immigrant detention. By establishing clear guidelines and procedures, the program endeavors to streamline the application process, ensuring equitable access to unemployment benefits for those in need.

The initiative comes in the wake of prolonged deliberations regarding jobless benefits for undocumented immigrants and nontraditional workers in New York. Amid the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, the state previously allocated $2.1 billion to the Excluded Workers Fund, offering a lifeline to those excluded from conventional unemployment benefits.

Gov. Kathy Hochul’s proposed budget for fiscal year 2025 underscores a commitment to supporting asylum seekers, with significant allocations directed towards housing and legal assistance. The proposal has met with opposition from Republicans, who argue for prioritizing legal residents and taxpayers in the allocation of state resources. Senate Minority Leader Rob Ortt contends that limited resources should be reserved exclusively for those who have contributed to the state’s tax base.

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