Connect with us

International

Sara Carter Discusses White House Doxing of Troops with Retired Special Operator Husband

Published

on

1020

In a riveting turn of events, President Biden’s quest for a compelling photo opportunity with some of America’s most elite warriors has inadvertently unleashed a wave of peril that threatens the lives and well-being of those tier-one military operatives and their families.

Picture this: Biden, on a diplomatic visit to Israel, seizes an opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder with the fearless members of the U.S. Army’s legendary Delta Force. It’s a powerful moment, but what happened next sent shockwaves through the defense community.

With an eagerness to gain public approval, White House officials eagerly released the photograph without obscuring the faces or tattoos of these elite soldiers beside the President. Unbelievably, this unredacted image remained online for a mere hour, but it was enough to shatter the cloak of anonymity that these special operators hold so dear.

The repercussions are profound, for these unsung heroes live their lives with an acute understanding of the dangers they face daily. They maintain a discreet public profile, well aware that their adversaries might stop at nothing to harm them or their loved ones if their identities were ever revealed.

Today, prepare to be moved, as Sara is joined by her husband, Marty, a dedicated veteran Delta Force who valiantly fought terrorists in the heart of Afghanistan, even though it cost him his sight. Together Sara and Marty share their intimate insights into the grave consequences of this careless move, one that has indelibly impacted the safety and peace of mind of those who’ve sworn to protect our nation and the ones they hold dear.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

International

Report: North Korean ballistic missile fired by Russia into Ukraine contained components sourced from U.S.

Published

on

GettyImages 1238675143 scaled

A new report from Conflict Armament Research (CAR), a U.K.-based investigative organization, determined that a North Korean ballistic missile which was fired by Russia into Ukraine contained “numerous” electronic components sourced from the U.S. and Europe.

The Daily Caller News Foundation reported on the findings, noting approximately 75% of the 290 components analyzed in the missile originated from U.S.-based companies, and an additional 16% of components came from European firms, according to the CAR report.

The electronic components came from 26 countries in total and were largely utilized in the missile’s navigation system, according to the report. It isn’t clear how the components ended up in North Korea’s possession, as the country is strictly sanctioned by a bulk of the international community, but it’s possible other foreign companies, acting as middlemen, bought the components and then diverted them to the communist country.

However, the fact that North Korea was able to acquire so many American electronic component parts suggests “that the country has developed a robust acquisition network capable of circumventing, without detection, sanction regimes that have been in place for nearly two decades,” according to the report.

CAR documents “weapons at the point of use and track their sources back through the chains of supply.”North Korea gathered the components, assembled the missile and shipped it to Russia, all within a relatively short time period, according to the report. The missile was recovered by CAR on Jan. 2, and the investigators determined it could not have been manufactured before March 2023.

The U.S. government and intelligence agencies are working to stop sensitive American intellectual property from ending up in the hands of several foreign adversaries. North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un and Russian President Vladimir Putin have strengthened their relationship since Russia first invaded Ukraine in February 2022.

“Due in part to our export and sanction controls, Russia has become increasingly isolated on the world stage, and they’ve been forced to look to like-minded states for military equipment,” White House National Security Council (NSC) spokesman John Kirby said during a press briefing in January. “One of those states is North Korea.”

 

Continue Reading

Trending