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Salem police declare Antifa protest at Oregon State Capitol an ‘unlawful assembly’

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Oregon

The Salem Police Department (SPD) declared an “unlawful assembly” at the Oregon State Capitol after violent Antifa protests broke out on Sunday evening.

https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1376472586868158466

Hundreds of Antifa demonstrators clashed with right-wing protestors in response to a planned “Freedom” rally and flag wave.

“Shortly before noon, approximately 100 individuals wearing black clothing and ballistic vests and carrying firearms, bats, skateboards, umbrellas, shields and gas masks arrived on the capitol mall grounds,” the SPD said.

The crowd was “heavily armed,” according to the SPD.

SPD said they received reports of vehicles driving past the Capitol being struck with balloons filled with paint as well as lasers being pointed at drivers.

Author and journalist Andy Ngo shared a video of Antifa members smashing vehicles that displayed U.S. flags.

https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1376320352435978241
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Ngo shared another video of a female who was almost killed inside of her car by an Antifa attack.

https://twitter.com/MrAndyNgo/status/1376330843556360194

Police issued a warning to protesters that were participating in the unpermitted event and blocking the streets.

“Exit the roadway and obey all laws,” they said. “Failure to do so may result in arrest. Stay on the sidewalks and exit the roadway.”

Oregon State Police and Salem Police declared the gathering as an “unlawful assembly” and police formed a line in front of the Capitol building.

Authorities advised residents and visitors to avoid the Capitol area and added that the SPD, Oregon State Police and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office would be monitoring the situation and were “prepared to act in the interest of the public’s safety.”

Four hours later, the SPD announced that the riots had ceased and protestors had left the scene.

“Activities have come to conclusion as protestors have left the area. Our thanks to the many partner agencies that assisted with handling the protest activity and the criminal conduct of a several individuals,” the department tweeted.

Several individuals were arrested and booked at the Marion County Correctional Facility on charges related to criminal activity, the SPD wrote in a press release.

The police department said they will continue to investigate the matter and encouraged anyone with information related to the incident to contact the Salem Police Department.

Follow Annaliese Levy on Twitter @AnnalieseLevy

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Israel

Military was prepared to deploy to Gaza to rescue U.S. hostages

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The Washington Post released an in-depth report on the intelligence support the United States has provided Israel during its war with Hamas. The assistance has not only helped to find and rescue hostages, but the Post writes it has “also raised concerns about the use of sensitive information.”

The United States provided some of the intelligence used to locate and eventually rescue four Israeli hostages last week, The Post has reported. The information, which included overhead imagery, appears to have been secondary to what Israel collected on its own ahead of the operation, which resulted in the deaths of more than 270 Palestinians, according to Gaza health officials, making it one of the deadliest single events in the eight-month-old war.

Sullivan, the White House national security adviser, stressed that U.S. forces did not participate in the mission to rescue the four hostages. “There were no U.S. forces, no U.S. boots on the ground involved in this operation. We did not participate militarily in this operation,” Sullivan told CNN’s “State of the Union” on Sunday. He noted that “we have generally provided support to the [Israel Defense Forces] so that we can try to get all of the hostages home, including the American hostages who are still being held.”

One critical piece of information from The Post involves a “canceled” U.S. mission to rescue eight Americans:

In October, JSOC forces in the region were prepared to deploy in Gaza to rescue U.S. citizens that Hamas was holding, said current and former U.S. officials familiar with planning for what would have been an exceptionally dangerous mission.

“If we managed to unilaterally get information that we could act on, and we thought we could actually get U.S. people out alive, we could act, but there was genuinely very little information specifically about U.S. hostages,” one official said.

However, the intelligence-sharing relationship between the United States and Israel is not without scrutiny and concern. The Post reports:

In interviews, Israeli officials said they were grateful for the U.S. assistance, which in some cases has given the Israelis unique capabilities they lacked before Hamas’s surprise cross-border attacks. But they also were defensive about their own spying prowess, insisting that the United States was, for the most part, not giving them anything they couldn’t obtain themselves. That position can be hard to square with the obvious failures of the Israeli intelligence apparatus to detect and respond to the warning signs of Hamas’s planning.

The U.S.-Israel partnership is, at times, tense. Some U.S. officials have been frustrated by Israel’s demand for more intelligence, which they said is insatiable and occasionally relies on flawed assumptions that the United States might be holding back some information.

In a briefing with reporters at the White House last month, national security adviser Jake Sullivan said Washington “has provided an intense range of assets and capabilities and expertise.” Responding to a May 11 Washington Post report, Sullivan said that the intelligence is “not tied or conditioned on anything else. It is not limited. We are not holding anything back. We are providing every asset, every tool, every capability,” Sullivan said.

Other officials, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, worry that intelligence the United States provides could be making its way into the repositories of data that Israeli military forces use to conduct airstrikes or other military operations, and that Washington has no effective means of monitoring how Israel uses the U.S. information.

The Biden administration has forbidden Israel from using any U.S.-supplied intelligence to target regular Hamas fighters in military operations. The intelligence is only to be used for locating the hostages, eight of whom have U.S. citizenship, as well as the top leadership of Hamas — including Yehiya Sinwar, the alleged architect of the Oct. 7 attacks, and Mohammed Deif, the commander of Hamas’s military wing. The State Department in 2015 designated both men as terrorists. Three of the eight U.S. hostages have been confirmed dead, and their bodies are still being held in Gaza, according to Israeli officials.

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