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Rubio pens letter to MLB commissioner asking if he plans to keep his membership at a GA golf club

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Florida Sen. Marco Rubio (R) on Monday penned a letter to MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred asking him if he plans to continue his membership at an exclusive Georgia golf club amid of the league’s decision to withdraw its 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta to protest the state’s divisive new election law.

RELATED: MLB withdraws All-Star Game, Draft from Atlanta in protest of new election law

“I write to ask you whether you intend to maintain your membership at Augusta National Golf Club,” Rubio wrote, referring to the golf club where the Masters Tournament is played annually. “As you are well aware, the exclusive members-only club is located in the State of Georgia.”

The senator said the decision to pull the game out of the state “reeks of hypocrisy” and one that “will have a bigger impact on countless small and minority owned businesses in and around Atlanta, than the new election law ever will.”

In the letter, Rubio also accused Manfred of hypocrisy regarding its business in authoritarian countries.

“Will Major League Baseball now end its engagement with nations that do not hold elections at all like China and Cuba? Will you end your lucrative financial relationship with Tencent, a company with deep ties to the Communist Party and actively helps the Chinese Government hunt down and silence political dissidents?” Rubio wrote.

However, the Florida Republican doubted that the league would do so.

“I am, of course, under no expectation any of this will happen,” he wrote. “Taking the All-Star game out of Georgia is an easy way to signal virtues without significant financial fallout. But speaking out against the Chinese Communist Party would involve a significant loss of revenue and being closed out of a lucrative market.”

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @DouglasPBraff.

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Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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