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Roger Stone: President Trump saved my life

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Trump-ally Roger Stone says President Donald Trump saved his life from a “near-death” prison sentence by granting him clemency on Friday, Stone said in his first interview Monday on “Hannity” since the President announced his decision.

“I know there were many many people that told him ‘in an election year, don’t do this, let Roger Stone wait maybe for a pardon after the election.’ Sean, I don’t think I would’ve lived that long, not with my asthmatic condition, not with now 60 COVID-19 cases in that prison, ” Stone said.

“I have deep deep affection for Donald Trump because I’ve known him 40 years, he’s a man of great justice and fairness, he’s a man of enormous courage, I knew he would take some shots for this, but I think most people, most fair minded people understand. He saved my life and at least on paper, he gave me a chance to fight for vindication.”

Stone says he’s hoping to have a “fair second trial.” “Now, I’m not a fool,” Stone explained. “I’m gonna be guided by the advice of my lawyers. As I understand it, if my conviction is overturned by the Appeals court, I’d be back in front of Judge Jackson. Judge Jackson issued an incredible ruling that said that I could not raise misconduct by the Special Counsel, the FBI, the DOJ, or any member of Congress, Adam Schiff.”

Trump, on Monday, said Stone’s investigation was baseless, adding that former FBI Director James Comey, former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, former FBI agent Peter Strzok, former FBI lawyer Lisa Page, former CIA Director John Brennan and others were the guilty ones who lied and altered documents to target him and the people around him. “I’m getting rave reviews for what I did for Roger Stone,” Trump said.

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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