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Republican takes back House seat from Democrat incumbent in S. California

Republican Michelle Steel has unseated the one-term Democratic incumbent from her Southern California U.S. House district, the Associated Press has reported.

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Republican Michelle Steel has unseated the one-term Democratic incumbent from her Southern California U.S. House district, the Associated Press has reported. Steel now joins Marilyn Strickland from Washington State as the first-ever Korean American women elected to Congress.

Steel secured 51% of the vote in the 48th district, located in the once-reliably-Republican Orange County. Her opponent, Rep. Harley Rouda, was first elected the the House of Representatives during the 2018 midterms when the Democrats seized many suburban seats that used to vote more strongly Republican. Rouda ousted the 20-year GOP incumbent, Rep. Dana Rohrbacher.

It is worth noting that this win for Steel marks the second time in over two decades where a GOP candidate has defeated an incumbent Democrat in the Golden State, the AP reports.

This election cycle has already seen an unprecedented amount of GOP women elected to Congress, with this latest addition upping their numbers on Capitol Hill come January.

RELATED: ‘The year of the Republican woman’: Record-Breaking Number of GOP Women elected to Congress

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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Election

New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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