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Report: Suspected Chinese Spy Developed Relationships with U.S. politicians, including California Rep. Swalwell

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A suspected Chinese spy developed close relationships with U.S. politicians as a way to gain access to and influence U.S. political circles, Axios has revealed after a yearlong investigation.

Christine Fang, also known as Fang Fang, was able to gain access to politicians through campaign fundraising, extensive networking and romantic or sexual relationships, according to Axios. She became particularly close with Democratic California Rep. Eric Swalwell, the report noted.

Fang enrolled as a student at California State University East Bay in 2011. She became involved in politics and went to extraordinary lengths to meet and befriend U.S. politicians.

She came into contact with many of California’s most prominent political figures.

Fang reportedly interacted with Swalwell at several political events, helped fundraise for his re-election campaign and put at least one intern into his office.

Fang also fundraised for Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, as well as had a romantic or sexual relationship with at least two midwest mayors, according to the report.

Fang’s activities became suspicious and she was put under FBI surveillance.

“The fact that she was traveling around the country” getting close to U.S. politicians “was a big red flag,” an FBI official told Axios. “She was on a mission.”

Fang portrayed herself ‘to be the connector between the Asian American community and members of Congress,’ sources told Axios.

A source also told Axios that Fang served as a ‘bundler’ during Swalwell’s 2014 Congress re-election campaign on his behalf, meaning she convinced others to donate to his campaign operations.

in 2015, FBI agents reportedly became alarmed at Fang’s activities. They alerted Swalwell and he immediately cut off all ties to Fang, according to a current U.S. intelligence official.

Fang left the country unexpectedly in 2015 amid the investigation.

Many of Fang’s political contacts were surprised about her sudden disappearance, Axios explained.

She reportedly had plans to attend a June 2015 event in Washington D.C., but suddenly said she couldn’t make it and needed to return to China.

“She disappeared off the face of everything,” Gilbert Wong, former mayor of Cupertino, California, told Axios.

Swalwell’s office provided a statement to Axios that said: “Rep. Swalwell, long ago, provided information about this person — whom he met more than eight years ago, and whom he hasn’t seen in nearly six years — to the FBI. To protect information that might be classified, he will not participate in your story.”

Since the Fang probe, the FBI has prioritized investigations into Chinese influence operations. The agency created a unit dedicated to countering Beijing’s operations at state and local levels in May 2019.

U.S. national security officials believe the threat posed by China has only grown with time.

“She was just one of lots of agents,” said a current senior U.S. intelligence official, according to Axios.

U.S. officials supposedly believe Fang’s real reason for being in the U.S was to gather political intelligence and to influence rising U.S. officials on China-related issues.

Fang has not returned to the U.S. and has appeared to have cut off contact with her networks she spent years building in California, Axios reported.

“Fang’s case shows how a single determined individual, allegedly working for Beijing, can gain access to sensitive U.S. political circles,” Axios reported.

Last night, President Donald Trump tweeted a video of a Chinese professor suggesting that China has managed to influence U.S. policy for decades.

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1336161955845959680

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REPORT: China has vast network of covert police stations around the world

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China has a vast network of covert police stations abroad, according to a recent report by Safeguard Defenders, an NGO that focuses on human rights violations in China and other Asian countries. These police stations serve consular functions, but are also used by China to crack down on what the CCP deems “illegal” activity of Chinese nationals abroad. The police stations include at least 38 run by the Fuzhou City police, and 22 run by the Qingtian City police. Cities housing these police stations include New York, Toronto (which has three stations), London (two), Paris (three), Buenos Aires, Rio De Janeiro, and Tokyo.

Key findings of the report are below.

“Persuaded to return”

According to China, China has “persuaded to return [to China]” 230,000 Chinese nationals living aboard from April 2021 to July 2022 alone to face charges of fraud and telecommunications fraud. A Yangxia police station set up in Mozambique, for example, persuaded a Chinese national to return to China after being accused of stealing money from his employer. Chinese authorities also put pressure on the accused family to convince the accused to surrender.

Roughly 54,000 Chinese nationals were persuaded to return from northern Myanmar alone, in the first nine months of 2021. In July 2022, the government of Wenchang City warned that its citizens living in northern Myanmar must check in with their local police stations or face multiple penalties including blocking their children from attending urban schools back in China. Similarly, in February 2022, the government of Liayang City stated that Chinese “illegally staying” in northern Myanmar must return or the bank accounts of their immediate family members could be frozen.

The Nine Forbidden Countries

China has claimed that nine countries contain serious levels of fraud and telecom fraud perpetrated by Chinese nationals. Since November 2021, China has declared that Chinese citizens living in these nine countries must return to China immediately unless they have an “emergency reason” or a “strict necessity” to travel or stay in those countries. Those countries are: Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, the UAE, and Turkey. However, the report questions whether these countries are truly awash in such fraud, as most of China’s oversees police stations are in the West, and only one of the nine countries (Cambodia) has such a police station. Chinese staying in the nine forbidden countries, as well as threats to family members as stated above, creates a “guilt-by-association” atmosphere intended to repatriate the Chinese nationals.

Conclusion

According to the report, Chinese police stations abroad serve to bypass “bilateral extradition treaties or other mechanisms of judicial cooperation” to cooperate with CCP-linked NGOs which effectively “[sets] up an alternative policing and judicial system within third countries.” Instead of using international judicial cooperation, which establishes due process, the presumption of innocence, and the right to a fair trial, China uses the above “persuade-to-return” methods and transnational police stations to circumvent international law and coerce Chinese nationals to return to China for trials. These policies show the power of China’s long-arm oppression over its own subjects.

You can follow Steve Postal on Twitter @HebraicMosaic

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