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Report: Minnesota bar owner leads 200-person march after threats of 5-year liquor license suspension

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Nearly 200 individuals reportedly participated in a march Sunday against Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz’s (D) executive order shutting indoor services for restaurants, according to multiple reports, reflecting the growing anger of business owners toward recently tightened statewide and local COVID-19 restrictions.

The owner of Interchange Wine and Coffee Bistro, Lisa Hanson, organized the march after being faced with a potential five-year suspension of her liquor license for continuing to defy the executive order, CBS Minnesota reported Sunday.

“It’s time for us patriots to rise up, in a peaceful way of course, and to say, ‘Hey, enough is enough,’” Hanson reportedly said.

RELATED: Watch: Angry business owner crashes live news segment, rails against COVID-19 restrictions in Michigan

CBS Minnesota reported that, since mid-December, a temporary restraining order has been placed against The Interchange. Additionally, the Minnesota Department of Health has suspended its license and the Minnesota Department of Public Safety for 60 days plans to suspend the bar’s liquor license.

“We are open for business,” Hanson said. “[We’re] staying open because we need to make money to pay bills.”

Hanson, according to CBS Minnesota, believes the state is unlawfully enforcing an order. If her bar continues to violate the executive order, it reportedly could lose its liquor license for a period of five years.

“We’re well aware of what the consequences could be,” Hanson said, according to CBS Minnesota. “Either I closed permanently or I opened fully, so I opened fully . . . and yes, I knew the risks going into that.”

Moreover, Hanson acknowledges that her effort is about principle at least as much as it’s about her bar, the news outlet wrote. As part of her stand-off with state authorities, CBS Minnesota reports that inside The Interchange are pocket-size United States Constitutions laid out on a counter, protest T-shirts on sale, and a tip jar that’s been converted into a legal fund.

“We believe that we will see victory in this,” Hanson added.

It should be noted that Hanson is entitled to a court hearing before any liquor license suspension can go into effect, the news outlet stated. She reportedly said she plans to consult with her attorney on how to proceed.

Similar protests against COVID-19 restrictions targeting indoor services in bars and restaurants have sprung up across the country in recent months. These tighter restrictions were issued during the late autumn, when coronavirus cases were skyrocketing across the U.S. and still continue to skyrocket during the holiday travel season.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Trump: Tanks to Ukraine could escalate to use of ‘NUKES’

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Former President Donald Trump stated bluntly on Truth Social,  “FIRST COME THE TANKS, THEN COME THE NUKES. Get this crazy war ended, NOW. So easy to do!”

Trump was referring to the escalation of war in Ukraine. He, like many other commentators and lawmakers, are warning that the decision to continue sending weapons – and now tanks – could potentially lead to the use of “nuclear weapons.”

It’s mission creep and it’s dangerous, they say.

Why? Because Russian President Valdimir Putin has indicated in two different speeches that he would use nuclear weapons to defend Russia, if needed. Those warnings are not just bluster but a very real possibility.

And the escalation of war is visible.

Russia launched 55 missiles strikes across Ukraine Thursday, leaving 11 dead. The strikes come one day after the United States and Germany agreed to send tanks to Ukraine in an effort to aide the country. 47 of the 55 missiles were shot down according to Ukraine’s Air Force command.

Eleven lives were lost and another 11 were injured additionally leaving 35 buildings damaged in the wake of the attacks. According to The New York Times, Denys Shmyhal, said in a post on Telegram. “The main goal is energy facilities, providing Ukrainians with light and heat,” he said.

Ukraine is now demanding that they need F-16 fighter jets. In a post on twitter Ukrainian lawmaker, Oleksiy Goncharenko said, “Missiles again over Ukraine. We need F16.”

The US has abstained from sending advanced jets in the chances that a volatile decision could foster more dangerous attacks like former President Trump’s post on Truth referred to. If the US did authorize the decision to lend Ukraine the F-16 jets Netherlands’ foreign minister, Wopke Hoekstra, would be willing to supply them. According to The New York Times, Hoekstra told Dutch lawmakers, “We are open-minded… There are no taboos.”

F-16 fighter jets are complex to work on, they are not the average aircraft that can be learned in a matter of weeks. It can take months for pilots to learn how to fly these birds. European and US officials have the concern that Ukrainian forces could potentially use the jets to fly into Russian airspace and launch attacks on Russian soil.

Western allies are trying to avoid such a provocation, because that could lead to nuclear warfare in reference to what Putin has said he would do to defend his country.

 

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