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Rep. Steube: African American Cop Was Killed In Florida, MSM Won’t Tell You These Stories

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Congressman Greg Steube, R-FL, understands national security and law enforcement. For him, it’s personal. Not only is his brother a police officer in Florida and his father a retired law enforcement officer, but Steube, himself, served honorably for America’s national security.

Like many great patriots, Steube was motivated by a call to protect the nation following the Al-Qaeda terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. He quickly joined the U.S. Army. From 2004-2008, Steube served as an Airborne Infantry Officer, and then later with the Judge Advocate General’s Corps.

From 2006-2007, he was the Chief of Detainee Operations for Multinational Division North in Iraq with the 25th Infantry Division in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

In these trying times for our country, Steube offered his unique perspective to “The Sara Carter Show” on Thursday. In the interview, Steube expressed frustration over the anti-law enforcement sentiment spreading across our country in the wake of the tragic death of George Floyd.

“It is frustrating to me from somebody that’s always supported law enforcement what’s happening,” Steube told Carter. “And I think what happened to George Floyd should never have happened. I have an individual laying on the ground that’s handcuffed, and you’re gonna continue to keep your knee on his neck while he’s saying he can’t breathe, to me, that’s inexcusable. And that shouldn’t happen.”

“But to punish all law enforcement officers with a broad brush because the actions of one individual is completely wrong,” he said. “I think what a lot of people aren’t talking about is how did that officer in that department get to where they are. All of these departments that have had all of these problems and all of these issues are all run by Democratic commissions, and Democratic city councils, who have been beholden to the police unions.”

He noted that many of the police departments in Democratic run districts are accredited, like those in Republican districts.

“None of them are using training protocols that the agencies in my departments in my district use, and so they’re using training protocols from 20 years ago because the unions have pushed on the Democratic leadership, saying, ‘Oh, we don’t want your training protocols, that’s not gonna work.”

This he said has been a recipe for disaster.

He referred to the Minneapolis training protocol, saying that in a “specific section, a person on the (police) force can actually use” a neck restraint on somebody who’s resisting arrest.

“Well, that’s not where we should be in our country right now,” he said. Steube noted that in places in Atlanta, Minneapolis, New York and Chicago the leadership has failed the community and law enforcement.

Steube described to Carter his brother’s 20 years of service in a county just a few miles from the district he represents. Steube said his brother, who’s served on a SWAT team for 10 years and only has a few years left before he retires, said more and more people are leaving his unit because they’re being targeted and their patrol cars are getting looted.

The disrespect for law enforcement has also kept important stories from the news cycle, Steube explained to Carter, telling a story of an African American officer who was killed in his district that “you’ll never hear about… in the mainstream media.” He also told the story before the House Judiciary Committee this week as lawmakers inched closer to moving a police reform bill through Congress.

“An African American officer who works worked for the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in Florida, just south of my district, was killed this past weekend. His funeral is on Monday. I talked about it in the hearing yesterday,” Steube said.

The officer, Julian Keen Jr., was responding to a hit and run in plain clothes, but as soon as he identified himself as a police officer, “the bad guy pulled out a gun and shot and killed him.”

“Prior to the end, there was no threat, so he was intentionally killed because he was an officer and identified himself as an officer,” Steube said. “That’s what’s going on in our communities in the state because of the left media perpetuating all of these things because they think it benefits their mantra and their narrative, and they would love nothing more than to create chaos.”

He said a lot of “really good people who want to serve their communities and their country and law enforcement” aren’t going to do it anymore and in the end the entire nation will suffer.

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Minnesota farmer’s lawsuit prompts removal of race and sex-based grant program

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Five months after Minnesota farmer Lance Nistler filed a federal lawsuit with the help of the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF), the state has removed race- and sex-based preferences from its Down Payment Assistance Grant Program. This significant policy change followed Nistler’s legal challenge, which highlighted the discriminatory nature of the program’s selection process.

Pacific Legal Foundation writes involvement in Nistler’s case drew attention and criticism from Minnesota progressives. Writing in the Minnesota Reformer, Sigrid Jewett accused PLF of using Nistler “as a pawn in a larger culture war game.” She questioned why a California-based legal firm with numerous Supreme Court victories would be interested in representing a small Minnesota farmer pro bono.

PLF opposes all race- and sex-based preferences in the law, and that’s the real reason the firm chose to represent Nistler. The foundation stands against discrimination in various domains, including government board selections, school admissions, government contracts, and grant distributions, such as in Nistler’s case.

Here are the facts: Minnesota’s Down Payment Assistance Grant Program offers up to $15,000 toward the purchase of farmland. Recipients are chosen through a lottery system. However, before the policy change, even if a recipient was among the first picked through the lottery—as Nistler was, being selected ninth—they could be bumped to the back of the line if they were not a racial minority, female, LGBTQIA+, or otherwise designated as an “emerging” farmer by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Despite being chosen ninth in the lottery, which awarded grants to 68 applicants, Nistler did not receive a grant. He was moved from ninth to 102nd on the waitlist because he is a white male.

Nistler grew up on his family farm, milking cows. “They would lose money every year,” he says of the family operation. After he left for school, his family sold the cows and switched to farming soybeans, oats, and wheat. Lance’s father and uncle now run the farm, but they’re getting older. Lance, who has a degree in electronic engineering and worked in HVAC, is interested in buying a 40-acre chunk of the family farm, becoming the fourth-generation farmer in his family.

The land isn’t just going to be given to Lance. This is a working farm, and the Nistlers aren’t a wealthy family that can transfer land from one generation to the next without consideration. “My dad and uncle, they don’t have 401(k)s or anything,” Lance says. “I mean, the land and the equipment, that’s their retirement. This stuff isn’t given away. I’m not just going to get it handed down to me and inherited. It has to be purchased, and it is not cheap.”

Despite being from a farming family, Lance considers himself a new farmer—he has never owned farmland before, and he has an electronics background. Buying these 40 acres would be a huge step for Lance, planting him firmly in the farming world, which is what Minnesota’s grant program aimed to do. The idea that he would have qualified as an emerging farmer if only his skin were a different color struck Lance as wrong.

“The country we live in, the idea is it’s equal opportunity for everyone,” he says. “And if that’s what it is, then well, why shouldn’t I have the same chances?”

When Lance filed his lawsuit in January, the complaint argued that the discriminatory process violated the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause. The complaint stated:

“Nistler brings this lawsuit to vindicate his constitutional right to equal protection of the law. He brings it to give all Minnesotans a fair chance at a difference-making grant program. He brings it in the hope that he will be able to own that small farm in the near future. He brings it because he is not giving up on his dream.”

In May, after Lance called attention to the unconstitutional policy, Minnesota Governor Tim Walz signed legislation removing the race and sex prioritization from the program. Now, Minnesota will treat farmers equally—as the Constitution promises.

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