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Rep. Liz Cheney criticized by Wyoming GOP for voting ‘yes’ on impeachment

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After Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the No. 3 House Republican, voted Wednesday in favor of impeaching President Donald Trump for “willful incitement of insurrection,” the Wyoming Republican Party criticized her for her vote in an ominous statement. This follows calls from other Republicans for her to be stripped of her leadership.

RELATED: House votes to impeach Trump, making him first president to be impeached twice

Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, in her Tuesday statement announcing she would vote for impeachment said of Trump’s speech in Washington, D.C. on January 6 that “there has never been a greater betrayal by a President” of his office. After Trump’s speech, a rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol to prevent the certification of the states’ Electoral College votes and President-elect Joe Biden‘s 2020 election victory.

Nine other House Republicans joined Cheney Wednesday in voting for impeachment.

“The wind in Wyoming has been horrendous today—with gusts up to 65 miles per hour. That is nothing compared to the whirlwind created by Representative Cheney’s announcement that she would be voting to impeach President Trump, and her subsequent follow-through of doing just that,” the Wyoming Republican Party said at the opening of their statement published Wednesday but after the vote.

“There has not been a time during our tenure when we have seen this type of an outcry from our fellow Republicans, with the anger and frustration being palpable in the comments we have received. Our telephone has not stopped ringing, our email is filling up, and our website has seen more traffic than at any previous time,” the statement continues. “The consensus is clear that those who are reaching out to the Party vehemently disagree with Representative Cheney’s decision and actions.”

The statement then presents a bullet-point list of reasons why the state party feels Cheney was wrong to vote “yay.” They mostly argue: that her vote doesn’t reflect how Wyoming feels about the president, 70% of whom voted for Trump; that she denied him due process and “judged the ‘evidence’ before it was presented”; and that he did not incite anyone to riot.

“We as a Party respect our elected officials and assume that they will respect and represent their constituents,” the statement concluded. “We are receiving the message loud and clear that what happened yesterday is a true travesty for Wyoming and the country.”

After her Tuesday announcement that she would vote “yay” and her vote the next day, some of her GOP colleagues have called for her to be stripped of her leadership.

Firing back, Cheney told the Capitol Hill press pool Tuesday, per The Hill, that “I’m not going anywhere. This is a vote of conscience. It’s one where there are different views in our conference.”

“But our nation is facing an unprecedented—since the Civil War—constitutional crisis,” she added. “That’s what we need to be focused on. That’s where our efforts and attention need to be.”

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), an ardent defender of Trump and a founder of the House Freedom Caucus, on Wednesday called for the removal of Cheney from her position as House Republican Conference chair, per The Hill.

“We ought to have a second vote,” Jordan told reporters. “The conference ought to vote on that.”

Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), the House Freedom Caucus’s current chair, on Fox News said that he didn’t think the No. 3 House Republican “should be the chair of the Republican conference anymore” and that “she’s not representing the Republican ideals,” per The Hill.

Rep. Matt Rosendale (R-Mont.) said Cheney “ignored the preferences of Republican voters,” proving she’s “unfit to lead,” per the Associated Press.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Historic House Vote Expels Rep. George Santos Amidst Scandal

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In a turn of events, the House of Representatives made history on Friday with a vote to expel Rep. George Santos (R-N.Y.), marking the first such expulsion in over two decades. A moment fraught with gravity unfolded as Speaker Mike Johnson wielded his gavel to formalize Santos’ removal, setting a precedent in congressional annals.

Santos, indicted on 23 counts related to wire fraud, identity theft, and other charges, has not faced conviction but stands accused of misusing campaign funds for opulent purchases. The bipartisan vote, tallying 311 to 114, signaled robust support for expulsion, with a marginally higher number of Republicans opting to retain Santos.

Questions loomed as Speaker Johnson left the chamber, his silence leaving the fate of the ongoing government spending battle uncertain. According to reports from Fox News, Democratic Rep. Steny Hoyer emphasized the non-partisan nature of the decision, asserting that members concluded Santos had tarnished the House’s reputation and was unfit for representation.

Within the GOP, conflicting opinions emerged, with Rep. Darrell Issa arguing against expulsion, citing the presumption of innocence. The tight-lipped stance of the House Ethics Committee played a pivotal role in the deliberations.

Conversely, members of the New York Republican delegation, led by Rep. Marc Molinaro, asserted Santos’ commission of crimes, justifying expulsion based on a comprehensive investigation.

Santos himself predicted the outcome in an exclusive morning interview on “FOX & Friends.” This vote not only underlines the House’s rare use of expulsion powers but also sets a critical precedent in handling members facing severe legal challenges.

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