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Rep. Jordan slams Dems saying, no one is safe from ‘cancel culture’

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GettyImages 997227550 Jim Jordan

Ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee Jim Jordan laid out the indisputable argument that the media and Hollywood are ardent supporters of the Democratic Party during Thursdays hearing, titled Diversity in America: The Representation of People of Color in the Media.

The House Judiciary Committee’s hearing included a number of witnesses, as well as Eric S. Dreiband, who is the assistant attorney general at the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He testified before the committee along with a number of representatives from civil rights organizations across the U.S. and some entertainers.

Jordan, however, pointed to the growing disparity in the media and Hollywood toward conservative viewpoints and growing biased against Republicans in general.

He called out the hypocrisy during his opening statement.

“Even the media is not woke enough for the Democrats,” said Jordan. “Hollywood is not woke enough for the Democrats. Ninety-six percent of media – their political contributions in 2016 went to Democrats, almost all of Hollywood supports the Democrats but that’s not good enough.”

Jordan added, “this hearing proves no one is safe from the cancel culture, no one is safe from the mob.”

Joy Villa, a Grammy award winning artist, testified at the hearing, noting that her diversity didn’t ever get her ostracized but her conservatism did.

“Until I came out as a Trump supporter by wearing a fabulous Make America Great Again dress to the Grammys 4 years ago, I had never been blacklisted—Yet as soon as I began sharing my conservative beliefs and my support for President Trump, I noticed a social chill,” Villa testified.

She recalled “back in 2015, talk show host Jimmy Kimmel talked favorably with Kelly Osbourne about one of my red-carpet gowns. This was before I was conservative.”

“Ava DuVernay, the celebrated black filmmaker who said she wants to use more black actresses in her films and have more diversity, blocked me on Twitter,” she added. “I was disinvited to casting round tables. I was blacklisted from industry events. I was not welcome on most talk shows. I was not included in pop-culture magazines or publications —unless as the butt of jokes. Rolling Stone Magazine told my publicist that they would not write about me because of my politics.”

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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