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Rep. Jordan reveals GOP will ‘keep the senate’ and ‘a good chance’ it will ‘take back the house’

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Listen to “Rep. Jim Jordan: I believe Amy Coney Barrett will be confirmed” on Spreaker.

The election will end with the Republican party maintaining its majority in the Senate and ‘actually a good chance’ of taking back control of the House, Rep. Jim Jordan, R- Ohio, told “The Sara Carter Show” Monday.

He said voters want someone who delivers and follows through with their promises. In that respect, President Donald Trump has not only has a strong base of support but independent voters who will back him come November.

One major issue concerning voters is whether Democratic candidate for president Joe Biden will pack the Supreme Court with additional justices, a policy he refuses to answer to. When asked by host Sara A. Carter about the mounting concern, Jordan expressed optimism that Republicans would have control over the executive branch and the legislature, keeping Democrats from pushing that agenda through in the first place.

“I think President Trump is going to win. I think we’re going to keep the senate I think there’s actually a good chance we take back the house. So I don’t think it’s going to happen,” Jordan explained.

He continued, “But if it would, would they do it? Of course, they would. That’s why they won’t answer the question. And the danger of this is first it’s been the precedent for 150 years, we’ve had nine justices on the United States Supreme Court, but if you expand it, you turn it into a super legislature.”

Court-packing, Jordan added, would make the Supreme Court, which is supposed to be an apolitical body, a “political entity” and “not a separate and equal branch of government that the founders envisioned when they set up this experiment they call America which has those checks and balances that federal system that protects your rights, protects your liberties, protects you from the rulesof the mob and everything else.”

Last week, Biden said that American voters don’t deserve to know where he stands on court-packing, dismissing it as an issue only Republicans are concerned with. Republicans argue that he will move forward with the process if he wins the presidential election.

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Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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