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Rep. Ilhan Omar wants to create a ‘pathway to citizenship’ for all illegal immigrants

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Rep. Ilhan Omar says the Biden Administration “must create a pathway to citizenship for all undocumented people living” in the United States. Omar’s stance isn’t surprising. She is a far leftest congressional member that has been repeatedly accused by opponents of being anti-Semitic and her push to support extreme immigration agendas is highly politically motivated. If not, calculated.

Omer met with CHIRLA activists that have fasted for five plus days to draw attention to their demands. According to its Twitter account “CHIRLA was formed in 1986 to advance the human and civil rights of immigrants and refugees. Educate, Organize, & Advocate.”

“Met with activists with @Chirla, who have been fasting for days to push for a pathway to citizenship,” Omar said in a tweet. “Immigrants get the job done.”

It’s hard to believe that Omar doesn’t realize there is already a legal pathway to citizenship. In fact, her family, as did mine and many others, have benefited from this great immigration system. There is no doubt that immigrants “get the job done.” They have done so since the founding of this nation but that doesn’t mean the United States has to give every undocumented person who entered the nation illegally citizenship. After all, their first act in the U.S. was to break the law.

Making matters worse, it’s the Democrats failed border policies that have led many of these immigrants to not only break the law, but to put their lives in danger on the journey to the U.S. border with Mexico.

It is true that we are a nation of immigrants. But we are also a sovereign nation of laws and those immigrants who came here legally and abided by the process under this.

You can follow Sara A. Carter on Twitter @SaraCarterDC

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Remote Learning Lowered Test Scores in Every State; Minority Students Hit the Worst

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Remote Learning

A paper published by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) shows remote learning has had a negative impact on students’ test scores in every state. Not only were students across the country affected, minority students were impacted the most.

According to the publication, remote learning led to declines in test scores for English and math, when compared to scores of students who went to schools with more in-person learning. “Our research shows that test score losses are significantly larger in districts with less in-person learning,” said Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University.

“This suggests, yes, that virtual learning was – and is – less effective than in-person learning, at least as measured by school-based testing” added Oster. “Passing rates in math declined by 14.2 percentage points on average; we estimate this decline was 10.1 percentage points smaller for districts fully in-person,” the study found.

The research combined “district-level schooling mode data from the 2020-21 school year,” “district-level test score data from 2015 to 2021” and “demographic data from the NCES,” according to the study.

Data was collected from students in third to eighth grades in 12 states: Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, Ohio, Rhode Island, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Score declines showed variations by state, as well. Virginia “which had the most complete virtual learning time, along with Colorado, saw an almost 32% drop on math test scores in the 2020-21 school year when compared to the 2018-19 school year” reports Tampa Free Press.

Wyoming, however, “which had the most in-person learning, along with Florida, saw just a 2.3% drop in English, the study found.”

“Changes in English Language Arts (ELA) were smaller than math scores overall, but drops in scores were greater in districts with larger black and Hispanic populations and students eligible for free and reduced lunch prices” reports Tampa Free Press.

“Districts that have a larger share of black and Hispanic students and less in-person schooling also saw a greater decline in ELA test scores than those with more in-person schooling. “

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