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Rep. Cheney wants to stay In Afghanistan and train locals in counterterrorism

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By Jenny Goldsberry

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) agreed with President Biden claiming that it’s not the not the United States’ job to build a democracy in Afghanistan. Instead, she’d like to see locals trained to counter terrorism in the region. Cheney appeared on NBC Sunday.

First, Host Chuck Todd pointed out that a similar effort failed in Vietnam. Yet Cheney remains hopeful that successful institutions can still be built in Afghanistan.

“There’s no question that there were mistakes. There were strategies that were pursued that didn’t work, strategies that were pursued that didn’t have the resources they needed,” Cheney admitted. “But for the United States to be in a position where we need to ensure Afghanistan is not a safe haven, that means that we’ve got to provide the support necessary to continue to have the Afghans bear the brunt of the fight. It means that we’ve got to help to build the institutions that can withstand, you know, the Al Qaeda and the Taliban threat that continues.”

Biden’s said something similar last week, when he claimed that Afghans aren’t willing to fight for themselves. In the same breath, Biden said the mission was “never supposed to be nation-building,” or “unifying.” Instead, it was about “preventing another terrorist attack on American homeland.”

“So this isn’t about building, you know, a democracy that looks like the United States,” Cheney said, reiterating the president. “It’s about what can we do to maintain stability so that we don’t have further terrorist attacks from Afghan soil?”

Meanwhile Cheney called former President Trump’s deal with the Taliban a “surrender.” “We completely undercut the Afghan national government, we absolutely emboldened the Taliban,” Cheney said. “And that led us to the catastrophe today.” However she admitted “there’s no question” Biden also could’ve gotten out of the agreement.

You can follow Jenny Goldsberry on Twitter @jennyjournalism.

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The Guardian Removes Osama bin Laden’s “Letter to America” Amidst Viral Resurfacing

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The Guardian, a left-wing media outlet, has taken down Osama bin Laden’s notorious “Letter to America” from its website this week after the words of the deceased terrorist mastermind, responsible for the attacks on September 11, 2001, gained traction on social media.

The letter, which had been published on The Guardian’s website since 2002, resurfaced online, causing a sudden spike in traffic. Social media users unearthed and shared the anti-American and antisemitic content, propelling the document to viral status. The Guardian, acknowledging the increased circulation without the full context, opted to remove the transcript.

According to reports from Fox News Digital, a spokesperson for The Guardian stated, “The transcript published on our website 20 years ago has been widely shared on social media without the full context. Therefore we have decided to take it down and direct readers to the news article that originally contextualized it instead.” The outlet declined to provide additional comments on the matter.

Osama bin Laden’s letter, translated into English, justified al-Qaeda’s attacks against the U.S. by citing American actions in Palestine. The deceased terrorist accused the U.S. of supporting the creation and continuation of Israel, labeling it one of the “greatest crimes” that must be erased. Bin Laden’s letter also propagated antisemitic tropes, claiming Jews control American policies, media, and the economy.

The 9/11 attacks, orchestrated by al-Qaeda, resulted in the deaths of nearly 3,000 people and left thousands more injured. The letter’s resurgence occurred as it was shared by social media influencers on platforms like TikTok, with some expressing a change in perspective. Pro-Palestinian activist Lynette Adkins was among those who shared the letter online, prompting discussions and reflections.

The Guardian’s decision to remove the letter from its website underscores the sensitivity surrounding the content and its potential impact, particularly as young individuals across America engage with pro-Palestinian talking points. The episode has sparked debates about the influence of social media in reshaping perceptions and the responsibility of media outlets in disseminating controversial historical documents.

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