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Psaki Dismisses The Price Of The Most Expensive Thanksgiving Ever

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Jen Psaki
Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki minimized the strain that the inflation crisis is putting on Americans as she was asked about President Biden’s decision to go to “a billionaire’s compound in Nantucket” for the most expensive Thanksgiving in history.

“What message does it send to the middle-class Americans President Biden says that he’s trying to help who are struggling this week to cover the cost of the most expensive Thanksgiving ever, that the president is going to take a few days off at a billionaire’s compound in Nantucket?” Fox News’ Peter Doocy asked.

“Well, first I would say, I don’t know if you’ve ever cooked a turkey before, but a twenty-pound turkey is a pretty big turkey, I think we can all agree. They’re about $1 more,” Psaki said.

It should be noted that the price of a turkey is 24% more expensive than last year, and the overall Thanksgiving dinner is 14% more expensive.

“So not to minimize that, any increase in prices is something the president is concerned about, as is evidenced by his announcement today and as his efforts to push forward on additional relief for the American people,” Psaki continued. “But I just want to be clear that there’s an abundance of Turkeys available, about $1 more for a 20-pound bird, which is a huge bird, if you’re feeding a very big family and that’s something that again, we’ve been working to make sure people have more money in their pockets to address it as the economy is turning back on.”

While the Biden administration claims they have been working “to make sure people have more money in their pockets,” inflation has resulted in people earning less. According to the Department of Labor, as of October 2021 “real average hourly earnings” and “real average weekly earnings” had decreased 1.2% and 1.6% from last year, respectively.

In contrast, the Trump economy saw an increase in “real average hourly earnings” and “real average weekly earnings” 3.2% and 5.0%, respectively, from pre-pandemic October 2019 to the height of the pandemic in October 2020.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. cupera1

    November 27, 2021 at 9:15 am

    This level of tin ear is astounding. This “lady” really does not care if families have to take out a loan to by groceries for a thanksgiving meal, I exaggerate a little. The inflation is causing people to chose between what few extras for the family and putting gas in the car or food on the table.

  2. Kosd

    November 28, 2021 at 1:49 pm

    This pos along with the thug biden and all the rich corrupted politicians will not feel how the american suffer .
    Their life is very easy and they decided to fuck up all Americans.
    For these who voted him in , enjoy the shows

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Economy

Americans are paying the highest taxes and largest share of GDP ever

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“People are now paying more in total income taxes than ever, even considering the 2017 tax cuts signed by former President Donald Trump. And they will be paying significantly more when elements of those tax cuts expire in 2025” according to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

The Washington Examiner reports on the CBO’s analysis that the Treasury expects a 28% surge in individual income taxes this year. The analysis was presented to Congress on Thursday, and explained more income taxes are ahead in 2025 after the Trump tax cuts expire.

“Receipts from individual income taxes — the largest source of federal revenues — rose sharply in 2021 and are projected to do so again in 2022 as the economy recovers from recession and temporary provisions enacted in response to the pandemic expire. Those receipts are projected to rise again after 2025 because of the scheduled expiration of some provisions of the 2017 tax act,” read the report.

“In 2021, receipts from individual income taxes totaled $2.0 trillion, or 9.1% of GDP. Under current law, and on the basis of receipts observed through late April of this year, CBO expects individual income tax receipts to rise by 28% in 2022, to $2.6 trillion. At 10.6% of GDP, that total is expected to be the highest amount of individual income tax receipts recorded since 1913, when ratification of the Sixteenth Amendment authorized the federal government to begin collecting income taxes,” said the report.

Additionally, the CBO stated that the overall federal revenue is expected to reach a record $4.8 trillion in 2022, a 19% one-year increase. “The strong revenue growth in 2021 and 2022 results mostly from large increases in collections of individual income taxes. Total revenues in 2022 are projected to equal 19.6% of the nation’s gross domestic product — the largest annual revenues relative to the size of the economy since 2000.”

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