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Project Veritas releases new videos of Zuckerberg and Facebook execs admitting they have ‘Too Much Power’

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Project Veritas released two new videos Sunday of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and other Facebook executives admitting to using their power to censor political speech while encouraging partisan objectives.

Each video contains nearly an hour of footage that was made available to Project Veritas through a Facebook insider that is working with Veritas to expose the big tech company, according to the organization.

In a Jan. 7 question and answer video, big tech executives answered questions regarding the Capitol riot and Former President Donald Trump’s administration.

“It’s so important that our political leaders lead by example, make sure we put the nation first here, and what we’ve seen is that the president [Trump] has been doing the opposite of that…The president [Trump] intends to use his remaining time in office to undermine the peaceful and lawful transition of power,” Zuckerberg said.

“[Trump’s] decision to use his platform to condone rather than condemn the actions of his supporters in the Capitol I think has rightly bothered and disturbed people in the US and around the world,” Zuckerberg continued.

Zuckerberg then suggested that the Capitol protestors were treated differently than Black Lives Matter protesters.

“I know this is just a very difficult moment for a lot of us here, and especially our Black colleagues. It was troubling to see how people in this [Capitol] mob were treated compared to the stark contrast we saw during protests earlier this [past] year,” he said.

Facebook’s Vice President of Integrity Guy Rosen explained Facebook’s process of censoring hate speech on the platform.

“We have a system that is able to freeze commenting on threads in cases where our systems are detecting that there may be a thread that has hate speech or violence… these are all things we’ve built over the past three-four years as part of our investments into the integrity space our efforts to protect the election,” Rosen said.

“I’m grateful for all the work you and the teams are doing,” Zuckerberg replied to Rosen.

In a video recorded Jan. 21, Zuckerberg spoke about the Presidential Inauguration and praised President Biden’s speech.

“Yesterday was truly a historic day. The past few weeks have certainly been a very difficult time in our nation. But we got our new president. We also have the first woman and the first person of color as our vice president in the history of our country,” he said.

“The swearing in of Vice President Harris really stands as a reminder that despite the challenges that we are facing as a country, we all have so much to be proud of,” he added.

“I thought President Biden’s inaugural address was very good.”

Zuckerberg then commended Biden for the Executive Orders that were passed on his first day in office.

“In his first day, President Biden already issued a number of Executive Orders on areas that we as a company care quite deeply about and have for some time,” he said. “Areas like immigration, preserving DACA, ending restrictions on travel from Muslim-majority countries, as well as other Executive Orders on climate and advancing racial justice and equity. I think these were all important and positive steps.”

Facebook’s Head of Global Affairs Nick Clegg also addressed the backlash that the company received after Trump’s suspension from the platform.

“There has been quite a lot of disquiet expressed by many leaders around the world, from the President of Mexico to Alexei Navalny in Russia, and Chancellor Angela Merkel and others saying, ‘well this shows that private companies have got too much power…’ we agree with that,” Clegg said.

He continued, “Ideally, we wouldn’t be making these decisions on our own, we would be making these decisions in line with our own conformity, with democratically agreed rules and principles. At the moment, those democratically agreed rules don’t exist. We still have to make decisions in real-time.”

Watch the full videos here:

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National Security

Army’s First Trans Officer Indicted for Spying for Russia

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The U.S. Army’s first transgender officer and his wife, a Maryland doctor, are making headlines. No, not for breaking any ideological woke barriers; for “allegedly attempting to transfer confidential military medical information to Russia.”

The two were charged in an eight-count indictment on conspiracy charges Wednesday. Major Jamie Lee Henry, who lived with his anesthesiologist wife Anna Gabrielian, was granted his request to officially change his name in accordance with his gender preference in 2015.

Henry and Gabrielian allegedly volunteered to “retrieve private medical records from the United States Army and Johns Hopkins in order to assist the Russian government.”

National Review reports:

The pair are accused of stealing patient health files from Johns Hopkins and Fort Bragg and giving them to an individual they believed to be working for the Russian government. They aimed to show that they could access classified information and readily provide it to Moscow to demonstrate their allegiance, according to the indictment.

However, the individual to whom they hoped to deliver the information was an undercover FBI agent. At a covert August 17 meeting, Gabrielian told the agent that she was devoted to helping Russia’s cause even if it cost her her job or landed her in prison. She arranged a subsequent meeting with Henry and the agent, still believing him to be affiliated with the Kremlin.

That evening, in the agent’s hotel room, Henry expressed that he was committed to supporting Russia and had considered enlisting in the Russian army after the invasion of Ukraine. However, he told the agent he was disqualified because he didn’t have any “combat experience.”

“The way I am viewing what is going on in Ukraine now, is that the United States is using Ukrainians as a proxy for their own hatred toward Russia,” Henry reportedly told the agent.

“Prior to Henry’s case, identifying as a sex different than the one on one’s birth certificate made a soldier unfit for military service, warranting discharge” writes National Review.

Gabrielian worked at the Johns Hopkins school of medicine, and Henry worked as a staff internist stationed at Fort Bragg.

If convicted, the two could face up to five years in federal prison for the conspiracy charge, and a maximum of ten years in federal prison for each count of publishing secret military medical records.

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