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Pro-Abortion Protesters Allegedly Take Abortion Pills Outside Supreme Court

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In order to protest Mississippi’s ban on most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy, pro-abortion protestors allegedly took abortion pills – which are used to end pregnancies within the first 10 weeks – outside of the Supreme Court on Wednesday.

As reported by Fox News, “At least four women were seen taking pills as others cheered. The group Shout Your Abortion did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment on the video and protest.”

“Abortion pills forever,” the protesters repeatedly chanted in a view posted on Twitter by feminist activist Erin Matson Wednesday morning.

“Epic action from @ShoutYrAbortion — people took abortion pills outside the Supreme Court!” Matson captioned the video.

 

On Wednesday, protesters gathered outside the Supreme Court as the Justices prepared to sit for oral arguments in a case that could potentially overturn Roe v. Wade.
The case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, is over a 2018 law in Mississippi that bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

The 1973 decision Roe v. Wade and the 1992 decision Planned Parenthood v. Casey forced states to allow women to get an abortion until the point of viability, which is considered to be around 20 to 24 weeks of pregnancy.

Mississippi originally said in its petition to the Court that the case does not require them to overturn Roe v. Wade or Planned Parenthood v. Casey. In July, however, Mississippi shifted its position, writing, “Roe and Casey are egregiously wrong” and said the Court should overrule those decisions.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Sue

    December 2, 2021 at 2:37 pm

    How stupid. I hope the get life long injuries from it.

    • Wyoming

      December 3, 2021 at 12:10 pm

      This is sick behavior by demented individuals who are consumed with bitterness and anger….

  2. SilverRascal

    December 3, 2021 at 12:39 am

    Looks more the group @couldn’t get a date on a bet!!!
    Abortion for this sad bunch is the least of their worries.

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Nation

Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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supply chain

The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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