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Poll: Majority of Republicans Would Support Trump as a 2024 Candidate

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According to a new national tracking poll by Morning Consult and Politico, Donald Trump will continue to have a powerful platform with the GOP base even after he leaves office.

The Nov. 21-23 survey collected data among 669 Republicans and 1,990 registered voters overall and found that he will most likely continue to have immense influence over the Republican Party from outside the government.

Trump is also the favored Republican candidate for a 2024 run according to a hypothetical test of 14 potential candidates. Trump received 53% of support among Republicans and Republican-leaning independents. Vice President Mike Pence came in second at 12% support. Donald Trump Jr. got the third-highest support at 8%, while other Republican figures, including Sen. Tom Cotton, Ted Cruz, Mitt Romney and Rick Scott, and Nikki Haley each received less than 5% support.

With Trump losing the 2020 presidential election, he is still eligible to run for a second term. Trump has given permission to begin the transition process to the next administration, while he has still not conceded. Trump has delayed conceding the election to President-elect Joe Biden as his legal team is continuing its fight against alleged election fraud in key swing states.

If Trump were to run in 2024, he would be a dominant force in the Republican party.

Nearly 68% said they consider Trump to be more in touch with the party’s rank and file, compared with 20% who said the same of Republicans in Congress. Trump was also more likely to be considered effective and committed to the country’s best interests. 56% of Republican voters say Trump is predominantly looking out for the party’s best interests.

Trump has told White House officials he could announce his 2024 candidacy as soon as he leaves the White House in January.

Some Republicans think Trump should step away and allow other candidates to emerge.

But others say that’s unlikely. As he leaves the White House, Trump will continue to have a resilient and powerful hold on the GOP, with loyal followers who will support him throughout another candidacy.

Trump received at least 68 million votes in 2020, five million more than he did in 2016, and about 48% of the popular vote, meaning he retained the support of nearly half of the public. If he decides to run for a second term, he will be a difficult candidate to beat.

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New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

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New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

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