Connect with us

Elections

Pittsburgh Antifa Leader Threatens Trump with Violence if he Fails to Concede, Twitter suspends him

Published

on

antifa

Adam Rahuba, a self-purported Antifa leader in Pittsburgh, is suspended from Twitter after threatening violence against President Trump if he fails to concede by the 2020 deadline.

The tweet, which was directed at @realDonaldTrump, warned that he was “armed & will retaliate.”

The tweet violated Twitter’s “hateful conduct” policy.

“If you do not concede by Sunday at noon, we will begin to block roads in conservative areas. Your supporters will not be able to go to work or the grocery story to feed their families. We are armed & will retaliate to attempts at vehicle manslaughter.”

Screen Shot 2020 11 25 at 10.46.35 AM

Before Rahuba’s Twitter account was suspended, he made multiple comments about “targeting conservative politicians” and how he’s begun “operations directly against MAGA voters.”

Rahuba has recently created a Parler account where he has continued his threats.

“Donald Trump has begun the transition but has failed to concede by the deadline set by the Antifa Board of Leadership. We will begin road-blocking operations in small towns and suburbs beginning tomorrow in the following states:

Oklahoma
Nebraska
Kansas
Alabama
Mississippi
West Virginia
North Carolina

Antifa refuses to START violence however any attempts to “run over” protesters will be handled appropriately. We are not liberals. We do not fear or hate guns.”

Screen Shot 2020 11 25 at 11.18.42 AM

Another post reads that “the next four years are going to be hell” for Trump supporters.

Antifa is a left-wing political movement. Over the summer, Trump pledged to classify the left-wing group as a terrorist organization.

During the September 29 debate, then-Democratic Party presidential candidate Joe Biden responded to President Trump’s comments about Antifa being a violent organization by telling him that Antifa is simply “an idea” and “not an organization.”

Jake Sullivan, Biden’s new White House National Security Advisor, called Antifa “a loose collection of people on the internet.”

“The United States has the capacity to designate foreign organizations as terrorist organizations, not domestic organizations. So we can start with the fact that this is not a kind of credible announcement that was made, it was a purely political announcement,” Sullivan said.

He added, “I’m not a deep expert on Antifa such as it is, but from what I do know, I think Antifa is probably better described as a loose collection of people on the Internet who share tactics and tools and, you know, people individually identify as part of this loose network, not so much an organization with the structure and leadership and funding and so forth.”

You may like

Continue Reading

Elections

New York City Dems Push Law to Allow 800,000 Non-Citizens to Vote in Municipal Elections

The New York City Council will vote on December 9 on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections

Published

on

Election

New York’s Democratic party is battling over the constitutionality of voter laws. On December 9, the New York City Council will vote on a law to allow green-card holders and residents with work permits to vote in municipal elections.

“Around 808,000 New York City residents who have work permits or are lawful permanent residents would be eligible to vote under the legislation, which has the support of 34 of 51 council members, a veto-proof majority” reports Fox News.

“It’s important for the Democratic Party to look at New York City and see that when voting rights are being attacked, we are expanding voter participation,” Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez, a sponsor of the bill and Democrat who represents the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, told the New York Times. Rodriguez immigrated from the Dominican Republic and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Fox News reports:

Laura Wood, Chief Democracy Officer for the mayor’s office, said at a hearing on the bill in September that the law could violate the New York State Constitution, which states that voters must be U.S. citizens age 18 or older.

Mayor Bill de Blasio indicated he could veto the bill following the September hearing.
“We’ve done everything that we could possibly get our hands on to help immigrant New Yorkers—including undocumented folks—but…I don’t believe it is legal,” de Blasio told WNYC radio at the time.

Mayor-elect Eric Adams, however, submitted testimony to the September hearing in favor of the bill. “In a democracy, nothing is more fundamental than the right to vote and to say who represents you and your community in elected office…Currently, almost one million New Yorkers are denied this foundational right.”

The legislation was first introduced two years ago, but had not yet gained traction due to the legal concerns.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Subscribe To Sara's Newsletter

Join Sara's mailing list to receive the latest stories as soon as they're available!

You have Successfully Subscribed!