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Payment Delays for Navy Have Forced Some Sailors into Taking Out Loans for Survival

There is no data on how many sailors have been affected by the delays

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Navy

Some Navy Sailors are being forced to take out loans just to survive, due to “months-long” payment delays. Military.com reported, “Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Vice President Gillian Gonzalez said her organization has seen an uptick in loan requests from sailors struggling to cover living expenses.”

Gonzalez said, unfortunately, “it doesn’t seem to hit one geographic area more than another” and that it “is happening a little bit of everywhere.” Many sailors have expressed their sentiments on social media, describing the delays and “desperate efforts to obtain loans for living expenses.”

One sailor wrote on Reddit that she and her husband were married in July, but still have not received their basic housing allowance. “My case has been open for over a month with NO action…I am just…beyond frustrated” she wrote.

Military.com reported:

A personnel specialist first class, who asked not to be identified because he is not authorized to speak with the press, said the root of the problem lies in the consolidation of personnel support and customer support detachments that began in 2017 and appears to be understaffed.
In September, MyNavy Career Center was established as a command — an effort to improve services to sailors.

“Shutting down dozens of processing centers took that transaction load and dropped it in one building’s worth of people,” the petty officer wrote in a message to Military.com. “Our only means of communication with them is through [MyNavy Career Center, or MNCC], which isn’t always great because it’s [mostly] civilians with a knowledge database … all they can do is look up tickets and give a status.”

MNCC is the Navy’s human resources services center, often referred to as the MNCC call center or just MNCC.

The petty officer also called the 30-day timeline “laughable,” given that personnel specialists work on a sailor’s pay package and send it through a processing system that has 30 days to act on it.

That system usually takes another 30 days to process, followed by 30 to 45 days for review and release — a course that can last three months or more.
“In a Hershey and Hallmark world, 30 days would be great,” he said.

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. JC

    November 23, 2021 at 12:04 pm

    Veterans with disability claims have similar problems. I know of a veteran, over seventy-five years of age, who was placed on a Hearing Docket for a disputed award in June of 2021. It is now the end of November. Six months on a hearing docket added to the time since the dispute was filed is entirely not acceptable. The governments excuse will be COVID & not enough employees.
    BUKKSHIT!

    • JC

      November 23, 2021 at 12:06 pm

      If you modify it – Scrap it. You just don’t want to know how Vets and active military really feel!

  2. Zenit08

    November 23, 2021 at 4:32 pm

    If the Biden DOD can’t purge enough troops through political indoctrination and deadly COVID jabs, it will starve them out.

    Memo to conservatives: QUIT IDOLIZING THE MILITARY. It is now as much an instrument of evil as the rest of the federal government.

  3. stylin19

    November 23, 2021 at 4:50 pm

    “…said the root of the problem lies in the consolidation of personnel support and customer support detachments that began in 2017 and appears to be understaffed.”

    2017?

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Nation

Boston Celtics Player Legally Changing Name to ‘Enes Kanter Freedom’ to Celebrate U.S. Citizenship

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Photo by Omar Rawlings/Getty Images

Boston Celtics center Enes Kanter is celebrating becoming a U.S. citizen in an incredible way. The 29-year-old athlete from Turkey is having his citizenship oath ceremony Monday, and will legally change his name to Enes Kanter Freedom.

Kanter is an outspoken human rights advocate who had his Turkish passport revoked in 2017 after he criticized Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Mediaite reports “he has also criticized NBA stars Michael Jordan and LeBron James for not doing enough to help the Black community and not speaking out against exploitative labor practices in China respectively.”

Celtics head coach Ime Udoka told the Boston Globe the team is “all for” the player’s name change. Kanter’s manager says the player will complete his legal name change to have Kanter become his middle name and Freedom be his new last name at Monday’s ceremony.

“We congratulated him as a group for getting his American citizenship last week,” Udoka said. “That’s who Enes is, we’re proud of him. Enes is who he is. He’s passionate about his stances and the name change; you look at [Ron] Artest [who changed his name to Metta Sandiford-Artest in the middle of the COVID-19 outbreak] and guys that have done it in the past. It’s something he wants to express and we’re all for it.”

Kanter has already changed his official Twitter account to Enes Kanter FREEDOM with his new last name in all caps. Freedom made waves when he tweeted the following on November 18: Money over Morals for the ‘King’. Sad & disgusting how these athletes pretend they care about social justice. They really do ‘shut up & dribble’ when Big Boss [inserted Chinese flag] says so. Did you educate yourself about the slave labor that made your shoes or is that not part of your research?”

The tweet included photos of basketball shoes he wore painted with human rights depictions and phrases such as “hey still researching and getting educated?” as well as “I am informed and educated on the situation.”

The statement is with regard to his criticism of LeBron James’ partnership with Nike. “Nike remains one of the NBA’s biggest sponsors as both organizations feed off their partnerships with China” reports Mediaite. Kanter Freedom also made an offer to take Michael Jordan and Nike co-founder Phil Knight to China in order for the men to “visit these slave labor camps and you can see it with your own eyes.”

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