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Over a year before Nashville bombing, bomber’s girlfriend told police he ‘was building bombs in the RV trailer’

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The girlfriend of Anthony Warner, the man who detonated the devastating bomb Christmas morning in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, told police over a year ago that he “was building bombs in the RV trailer,” new documents obtained by The Tennessean reveal.

Despite this new information, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation had stated that he wasn’t on their “radar” before the bombing that killed him and injured three other people.

No motivation behind the bombing has been determined yet. The bombing, which exploded outside an AT&T switching facility, blew up a city block and left 41 buildings damaged. The FBI has been investigating whether conspiracies surrounding 5G cellular networks were involved.

The Metropolitan Nashville Police Department (MNPD) on Tuesday published an incident report and synopsis dating back to August 21, 2019 showing the department asked the FBI to perform a background check of Warner after a woman named Pamela Perry who claimed to be his girlfriend alerted police that Warner “was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence.”

Police first got in touch with Perry when her attorney, Raymond Throckmorton III, phoned them that day detailing worries about suicidal threats she was allegedly making while she sat outside her home with firearms, the Associated Press reported, referencing an MNPD statement.

Furthermore, Warner “frequently talks about the military and making bombs,” Throckmorton told police, according to the report. The report also notes that he said he represented both Warner and Perry.

Back in August 2019, officers witnessed an RV parked in Warner’s fenced backyard but weren’t able to catch a glimpse of the vehicle’s interior when they stopped by his home in the Nashville neighborhood of Antioch, according to the report. When they knocked on the door, no one answered.

“They saw no evidence of a crime and had no authority to enter his home or fenced property,” MNPD spokesman Don Aaron told The Tennessean about how that trip to his house transpired.

Following this visit to Warner’s property, the city’s police said they warned Nashville’s Hazardous Devices Unit (HDU), a bomb squad, and requested that the FBI look into Warner’s background and see if he previously had any connections to the military.

The next day, “the FBI reported back that they checked their holdings and found no records on Warner at all,” Nashville police said Tuesday. On August 28, 2019, the U.S. Department of Defense reported that “checks on Warner were all negative,” Aaron added.

“At no time was there any evidence of a crime detected and no additional action was taken,” Nashville police also said Tuesday.

Joel Siskovic, a spokesman for the FBI in Memphis, said Wednesday that there weren’t allegations of a crime made at that time to the authorities, providing them no probable cause.

“If we were going to take action like a search warrant, we would have had to have probably cause,” Siskovic said. “We weren’t even at the stage where a crime had been alleged.”

Police and the HDU say they followed up during the week of August 26, 2019 and reached out to Throckmorton. The attorney allegedly said investigators couldn’t speak to Warner, who “did not care for the police,” or enter his property, the FBI told The Tennessean.

Throckmorton contested the authorities’ claim, saying he wasn’t working with Warner in August 2019, according to The Tennessean.

“I have no memory of that whatsoever,” Throckmorton said. “I didn’t represent him anymore. He wasn’t an active client. I’m not a criminal defense attorney.”

“Somebody, somewhere dropped the ball,” he added.

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on Monday published a criminal history for Warner. That report, however, only detailed a single arrest back in 1978 by Nashville police for marijuana possession.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

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Trump: Tanks to Ukraine could escalate to use of ‘NUKES’

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Former President Donald Trump stated bluntly on Truth Social,  “FIRST COME THE TANKS, THEN COME THE NUKES. Get this crazy war ended, NOW. So easy to do!”

Trump was referring to the escalation of war in Ukraine. He, like many other commentators and lawmakers, are warning that the decision to continue sending weapons – and now tanks – could potentially lead to the use of “nuclear weapons.”

It’s mission creep and it’s dangerous, they say.

Why? Because Russian President Valdimir Putin has indicated in two different speeches that he would use nuclear weapons to defend Russia, if needed. Those warnings are not just bluster but a very real possibility.

And the escalation of war is visible.

Russia launched 55 missiles strikes across Ukraine Thursday, leaving 11 dead. The strikes come one day after the United States and Germany agreed to send tanks to Ukraine in an effort to aide the country. 47 of the 55 missiles were shot down according to Ukraine’s Air Force command.

Eleven lives were lost and another 11 were injured additionally leaving 35 buildings damaged in the wake of the attacks. According to The New York Times, Denys Shmyhal, said in a post on Telegram. “The main goal is energy facilities, providing Ukrainians with light and heat,” he said.

Ukraine is now demanding that they need F-16 fighter jets. In a post on twitter Ukrainian lawmaker, Oleksiy Goncharenko said, “Missiles again over Ukraine. We need F16.”

The US has abstained from sending advanced jets in the chances that a volatile decision could foster more dangerous attacks like former President Trump’s post on Truth referred to. If the US did authorize the decision to lend Ukraine the F-16 jets Netherlands’ foreign minister, Wopke Hoekstra, would be willing to supply them. According to The New York Times, Hoekstra told Dutch lawmakers, “We are open-minded… There are no taboos.”

F-16 fighter jets are complex to work on, they are not the average aircraft that can be learned in a matter of weeks. It can take months for pilots to learn how to fly these birds. European and US officials have the concern that Ukrainian forces could potentially use the jets to fly into Russian airspace and launch attacks on Russian soil.

Western allies are trying to avoid such a provocation, because that could lead to nuclear warfare in reference to what Putin has said he would do to defend his country.

 

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