Connect with us

Featured

Over a year before Nashville bombing, bomber’s girlfriend told police he ‘was building bombs in the RV trailer’

Published

on

Screen Shot 2020 12 26 at 12.22.10 PM

The girlfriend of Anthony Warner, the man who detonated the devastating bomb Christmas morning in downtown Nashville, Tennessee, told police over a year ago that he “was building bombs in the RV trailer,” new documents obtained by The Tennessean reveal.

Despite this new information, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation had stated that he wasn’t on their “radar” before the bombing that killed him and injured three other people.

No motivation behind the bombing has been determined yet. The bombing, which exploded outside an AT&T switching facility, blew up a city block and left 41 buildings damaged. The FBI has been investigating whether conspiracies surrounding 5G cellular networks were involved.

The Metropolitan Nashville Police Department (MNPD) on Tuesday published an incident report and synopsis dating back to August 21, 2019 showing the department asked the FBI to perform a background check of Warner after a woman named Pamela Perry who claimed to be his girlfriend alerted police that Warner “was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence.”

Police first got in touch with Perry when her attorney, Raymond Throckmorton III, phoned them that day detailing worries about suicidal threats she was allegedly making while she sat outside her home with firearms, the Associated Press reported, referencing an MNPD statement.

Furthermore, Warner “frequently talks about the military and making bombs,” Throckmorton told police, according to the report. The report also notes that he said he represented both Warner and Perry.

Back in August 2019, officers witnessed an RV parked in Warner’s fenced backyard but weren’t able to catch a glimpse of the vehicle’s interior when they stopped by his home in the Nashville neighborhood of Antioch, according to the report. When they knocked on the door, no one answered.

“They saw no evidence of a crime and had no authority to enter his home or fenced property,” MNPD spokesman Don Aaron told The Tennessean about how that trip to his house transpired.

Following this visit to Warner’s property, the city’s police said they warned Nashville’s Hazardous Devices Unit (HDU), a bomb squad, and requested that the FBI look into Warner’s background and see if he previously had any connections to the military.

The next day, “the FBI reported back that they checked their holdings and found no records on Warner at all,” Nashville police said Tuesday. On August 28, 2019, the U.S. Department of Defense reported that “checks on Warner were all negative,” Aaron added.

“At no time was there any evidence of a crime detected and no additional action was taken,” Nashville police also said Tuesday.

Joel Siskovic, a spokesman for the FBI in Memphis, said Wednesday that there weren’t allegations of a crime made at that time to the authorities, providing them no probable cause.

“If we were going to take action like a search warrant, we would have had to have probably cause,” Siskovic said. “We weren’t even at the stage where a crime had been alleged.”

Police and the HDU say they followed up during the week of August 26, 2019 and reached out to Throckmorton. The attorney allegedly said investigators couldn’t speak to Warner, who “did not care for the police,” or enter his property, the FBI told The Tennessean.

Throckmorton contested the authorities’ claim, saying he wasn’t working with Warner in August 2019, according to The Tennessean.

“I have no memory of that whatsoever,” Throckmorton said. “I didn’t represent him anymore. He wasn’t an active client. I’m not a criminal defense attorney.”

“Somebody, somewhere dropped the ball,” he added.

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on Monday published a criminal history for Warner. That report, however, only detailed a single arrest back in 1978 by Nashville police for marijuana possession.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @Douglas_P_Braff.

You may like

Continue Reading

Featured

Biden frees Venezuelan President Maduro’s drug dealing relatives in prisoner swap

Published

on

Joe Biden

President Biden freed two of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro’s relatives Saturday in exchange for seven jailed Americans. The two nephews of Maduro’s wife Cilia Flores, had been convicted in the United States for drug dealing and sentenced to 18 years in prison, according to the BBC.

According to the report, the swap was in exchange for five American oil executives. Those Americans were “exchanged for two of Mr Maduro’s wife’s nephews, who were serving 18-year sentences in the US on drug charges,” the officials told the BBC. Maduro’s nephews were convicted under the Trump administration and the Venezuelan government claims that they were “unjustly” jailed in the United States.

In a statement from the White House Saturday, Biden said the American’s were  “wrongfully detained.”  He said the American’s  would soon be reunited with their relatives, according to reports.

“Today, we celebrate that seven families will be whole once more. To all the families who are still suffering and separated from their loved ones who are wrongfully detained – know that we remain dedicated to securing their release,” the Biden statement added.

Meanwhile, 13 Republican members of Congress sent a letter to Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, requesting more information on “the intelligence report” that alleges Maduro is emptying his prisons and allowing them to head to the United States in the caravans that crossing the porous border.

The letter states that the report warns Border Patrol agents to be on the look-out for “violent criminals from Venezuela among the migrant caravans heading towards the U.S.-Mexico border.”

“It has been widely reported that the Venezuelan regime, under the control of Nicolás Maduro Moros, is deliberately releasing violent prisoners early, including inmates convicted of ‘murder, rape, and extortion,’ and pushing them to join caravans heading to the United States,” the letter states.

You can follow Sara A. Carter on Twitter @SaraCarterDC.

You may like

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending Now

Advertisement

Trending

Proudly Made In America | © 2022 M3 Media Management, LLC