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Orange County Sheriff Says Deputies Will Not Enforce Newsom’s Stay-At-Home Order

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Gavin Newsom California Governor

On Thursday, California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a limited stay-at-home order that would take effect on Saturday, Nov. 21 and remain in effect until Dec. 21. It would require gatherings, movement and non-essential work to stop between the hours of 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. in California counties that are in the purple tier.

Orange County is one of the state’s 41 counties in the purple tier along with Los Angeles, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego County.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Department released a statement saying that its deputies will not be enforcing Gov. Gavin Newsom’s order.

“Throughout the pandemic, the Orange County Sheriff’s Department has taken an education-first approach with regard to the public health orders. We are currently assessing the action by the Governor. At this time, due to the need to have deputies available for emergency calls for service, deputies will not be responding to requests for face-coverings or social gatherings-only enforcement,” Orange County Sheriff Don Barnes said in the statement.

Newsom came under fire recently for breaking his own COVID-19 rules after photos surfaced of him maskless at a dinner party of 12.

News of the governor’s dinner party leaked just hours after Newsom pushed state guidelines requesting people to stay home and discouraging gatherings.

Newsom explained that the social gathering took place at an “outdoor restaurant.” However, photos obtained by Fox 11 in Los Angeles showed Newsom and the other attendees dining indoors in close proximity and without their masks. 

“I made a bad mistake,” Newsom said on Monday. “I should have stood up and drove back to my house. The spirit of what I’m preaching all the time was contradicted. I need to preach and practice, not just preach.”

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TN Republican introduces legislation to fight opioid shipments into U.S.

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Tennessee Republican Representative Diana Harshbarger is attempting to fight the opioid crisis and epidemic through new legislation. Introduced Friday, Harshbarger told the Daily Caller:

The Daily Caller first obtained a copy of the legislation, which addresses what Harshbarger calls a “loophole.” The legislation amends the Controlled Substances Act to specifically require registrants to investigate reports of suspicious orders of controlled substances and halt them if necessary. Under the version of the act currently in force, drug manufacturers and distributors are only required to report suspicious orders of opioids and other controlled substances to the DEA.

“Breaking the opioid epidemic’s stranglehold on our nation is one of my foremost priorities. In an effort to do so, my colleagues and I have identified a loophole that allows distributors to continue order fulfillment, even under suspicious circumstances.”

“My bill closes that loophole with the requirements and guardrails needed to ensure these addictive and potentially dangerous drugs do not fall into the wrong hands while the DEA investigates. The future of our nation depends on us solving the addiction crisis, and this is a step towards that outcome” Harshbarger continued.

The Daily Caller reports:

According to a congressional report released in September, the opioid crisis cost the U.S. $1.5 trillion during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CDC says 93,331 people died from overdoses in the U.S. in 2020, the highest in 50 years. Opioid-related deaths made up nearly three-quarters of the total.

Pharmaceutical companies have been blamed for contributing to the opioid epidemic. The Department of Justice is currently suing the pharmaceutical company AmerisourceBergen over allegations the company failed to report suspicious orders of opioids to federal law enforcement.

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