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Officer who shot Daunte Wright arrested, to be charged with 2nd-degree manslaughter

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The Minnesota police officer who fatally shot 20-year-old Daunte Wright, a Black man who was pulled over for driving an SUV with expired license plates, will be charged with second-degree manslaughter on Wednesday, a prosecutor said, according to multiple outlets. In the nights following the Sunday killing of Wright, cities in Minnesota have been rocked by massive protests, violence, and clashes between demonstrators and police.

Furthermore, on Wednesday morning, Officer Kim Potter—a 26-year veteran of the Brooklyn Center Police Department—was arrested at the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension in St. Paul, according to the Associated Press.

RELATED: Over 60 arrested during second night of riots in Minnesota

The charge against former Brooklyn Center police Officer Kim Potter will be filed Wednesday, Washington County Attorney Pete Orput said, per the AP. If convicted, she faces up to 10 years in prison or a fine of up to $20,000.

The charge and arrest of Potter come the day after she resigned from the department, along with Police Chief Tim Gannon.

“I believe it is in the best interest of the community, the department, and my fellow officers if I resign immediately,” Potter said in a statement. She claims that shooting Wright with her handgun was an accident, saying that she meant to grab her taser.

After releasing bodycam footage of the shooting on Monday, the chief said it was his belief that Potter mistakenly shot Wright after pulling out her gun instead of a Taser.

The footage showed her nearing Wright as he stood outside of his vehicle while another officer was arresting him. As Wright struggles with police, Potter yells, “I’ll Tase you! I’ll Tase you! Taser! Taser! Taser!” before firing a single shot from her handgun.

Demonstrators and Wright’s family, enraged by this, have argued that an experienced officer should easily know the difference between a Taser and a handgun, saying there’s no such excuse for the shooting.

You can follow Douglas Braff on Twitter @DouglasPBraff.

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Health Industry Distributors’ Association: Supply Chain Delays ‘A Healthcare Issue’

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The Health Industry Distributors’ Association (HIDA) released harrowing data stating “Transportation Delays Are A Healthcare Issue.” HIDA’s December release states, “research estimates that approximately 8,000-12,000 containers of critical medical supplies are delayed an average of up to 37 days throughout the transportation system.”

The statement continues, “The West Coast port with the greatest number of delayed medical containers are the Ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles. The most congested East Coast port is the Port of Savannah.”

An infographic is accompanied with the statement which breaks down the crisis further. 17 is the average number of days the shipments are delayed at the Port. There’s an 11 day average delay by rail, and a 9 day average delay by truck.

In those shipping containers, the infographic states 187,000 gowns, 360,000 syringes and 3.5 million surgical gloves are held. The ports with the most medical delayed supplies are Los Angeles/Long Beach, Savannah, New York/New Jersey, Charleston, Seattle, Oakland, Boston, Baltimore and Houston.

Axios reports under a “Why it matters” headline, that “Per their projections, medical supplies arriving at a U.S. port on Christmas Day won’t be delivered to hospitals and other care settings until February 2022.”

As a result, “that could delay critical supplies at a time when health care is already expected to most need them due to surges from Delta and Omicron.”

Additionally, “The supply chain problems can compound, starting with medical supplies languishing in U.S. ports for an average of 17 days, officials said.”

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