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No Democrats vote for ‘Parents Bill of Rights’ claiming it promotes ‘fascism’

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Democrats say a newly passed Bill which protects parents’ rights is promoting “fascism.” The House voted Friday to pass the Parents Bill of Rights Act in a 213-208 vote. All Democrats and a few Republicans voted against it. The Act would require school districts to give parents access to curriculum and reading lists, as well as require schools to inform parents if school staff begin encouraging or promoting their child’s gender transition.

The GOP bill “is a response to growing anger across the country about access to information on everything from school curricula to safety and mask policies to the prevalence of gender ideology and critical race theory in the classroom. Parents’ anger over these issues at school board meetings led to an effort by the Biden administration’s Justice Department to examine the ‘disturbing trend’ of violent threats against school officials” reports Fox News.

The bill says parents have “the right to know if a school employee or contractor acts to… change a minor child’s gender markers, pronouns, or preferred name; or… allow a child to change the child’s sex-based accommodations, including locker rooms or bathrooms.”

Democrats are attempting to use fear tactics, saying the GOP bill wants to engage in a dangerous book ban. “They want to ban books, they want to bully the LGBTQ+ community, they want to bring guns into classrooms, kindergarten and above. That’s their educational agenda,” said House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries, a New York Democrat. “Extreme MAGA Republicans don’t want the children of America to learn about the Holocaust” he ranted.

Republican Representative Ralph Normal from South Carolina rejected Jeffries nonsense: “Nowhere in this bill is it banning any books.” Rather, the goal of the bill’s language is to make sure parents are aware of sexually explicit books in school libraries.

Norman cited specific books that talk about kids who are “sexually active from the time I was 6,” or that include “explicit images of oral sex.”

“Parents, is this something you want your children to read?” Norman asked. “Parents, is this something that encourages academics and allows that child to compete in the 21st century?”

 

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1 Comment

  1. Terryr

    March 25, 2023 at 5:17 pm

    What country are we today? We used to be the greatest country in the world now we have been lowered to a back world dung hole buy the despicable democratic socialist government we now have forced upon us. This can’t continue without some very serious, intelligent, Americans who live, pay taxes, raise children, and love what used to be the United States of America it’s time to begin to wake up and decide enough is enough we want our country back.

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education

Harvard Reinstates Standardized Testing Requirement for Admissions

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Harvard University announcement it will reverse its test-optional policy and reinstate standardized testing as a requirement for admission. The move has stirred a contentious debate within the academic community. Effective for applicants seeking entry in the fall of 2025, Harvard College will mandate the submission of either SAT or ACT scores, with limited exceptions for circumstances hindering access to these exams.

Hoekstra contends that standardized tests provide crucial predictive insights into a student’s potential for success in higher education and beyond. By reinstating the testing requirement, Harvard seeks to gather more comprehensive data, particularly beneficial for identifying talent across diverse socioeconomic backgrounds.

Proponents of the move, like Harvard Kennedy School’s political economy professor David J. Deming, emphasize the universality of standardized tests, arguing that they offer a level playing field for all applicants. Deming underscores the accessibility of these tests compared to other metrics like personal essays, which may favor privileged students with greater resources.

However, the decision has sparked criticism from those who argue that standardized tests perpetuate inequities in admissions. Critics point to studies, such as those conducted by Harvard economists Raj Chetty and others, which highlight disparities in access to advanced courses and extracurricular opportunities among students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The controversy surrounding Harvard’s policy shift reflects broader concerns within higher education about equity, diversity, and inclusion. While standardized testing may offer a standardized measure of academic aptitude, it also raises questions about its ability to accurately assess a student’s potential in light of systemic educational disparities.

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